Career path – Goodbye Pert Breasts http://goodbyepertbreasts.com/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 06:08:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Career path – Goodbye Pert Breasts http://goodbyepertbreasts.com/ 32 32 Why diversity is vital for a strong cybersecurity team https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/why-diversity-is-vital-for-a-strong-cybersecurity-team/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 06:08:10 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/why-diversity-is-vital-for-a-strong-cybersecurity-team/ How would you sum up the year so far for yourself, your business, and the local tech industry?The pandemic has transformed the workplace and how businesses and consumers use digital technologies. The attack surface has expanded dramatically with the hybrid working model, and the cybersecurity industry has evolved to address the associated risks. At the […]]]>

How would you sum up the year so far for yourself, your business, and the local tech industry?
The pandemic has transformed the workplace and how businesses and consumers use digital technologies. The attack surface has expanded dramatically with the hybrid working model, and the cybersecurity industry has evolved to address the associated risks.

At the organizational level, our goal this year is to strengthen our security strategies to support the new work environment from anywhere. This has involved expanding our adoption of zero trust and providing ongoing, contextual training to our employees regarding the threat landscape and security controls. We have also intensified our efforts to align our SaaS business solutions and security processes with various international standards and regulations.

Why is diversity important for a strong cybersecurity team?
Cybersecurity is an area that requires a multidisciplinary approach to problem solving, allowing people from different specialties to contribute. Security engineers, threat analysts, incident responders, digital forensics experts, ethical hackers, and risk and compliance analysts are some of the specialized roles of a modern cybersecurity team .

The cyber threats we currently face are vast and launched by hackers with a variety of backgrounds and motivations. Having a team of individuals with diverse skill sets brings different ways of thinking and new perspectives to old problems and new challenges. Some common traits of people who thrive in this profession are curiosity, persistence, a risk-management mindset, and a willingness to take on challenges.

Building a diverse team is not only the right thing to do from a moral standpoint in terms of giving everyone opportunities, it is also quickly becoming a necessity due to the huge skills gap the industry is facing. .

What is stopping women from pursuing careers in cybersecurity?
There is an overall under-representation of women in engineering and computing. As a related field, cybersecurity also faces the same problem. A major deterrent is industry stereotyping. Often, people working in cybersecurity are portrayed as men in hoodies sitting in front of computer screens and hacking systems. It is described as a very stressful environment with fierce competition. For outsiders, this creates a negative and undesirable perception that can deter women from entering this field.

What steps should be taken to attract more women into this field and how do you think employers can make a difference?
Organizations need to broaden their idea of ​​the right person for an open position in cybersecurity. Traditional ways of recruiting often don’t take into account diversity and different experiences. Some important areas that employers can work on are:

Job awareness: Employers can partner with universities to offer early-career orientation and internship programs, making career paths more visible. This helps young graduates gain real-world experience in cybersecurity and makes the field more attractive to graduates of any gender.

Internal development: People can take different paths into cybersecurity, switching other teams like IT, software engineering, marketing, and even legal. Being open to such transitions and providing training will attract more passionate talent to the security team.

Highlight female role models: At the industry and organizational level, it is important to promote women in cybersecurity, their career paths and milestones. This positive reinforcement encourages women who are apprehensive to move on.

What are some key tips/tips you will offer aspiring leaders/entrepreneurs to help them advance in this industry?
At its core, cybersecurity is about protecting people from harm. There are many opportunities in this field for women with a risk management mindset and diverse perspectives. My key tips for excelling in this industry are:

Embrace learning: Cybersecurity is a very dynamic field that requires constant learning and upgrading. Staying up to date matters a lot in this industry. Be a continuous learner and always take on new challenges. Focus on excellence and prove yourself with your skills.

Cultivate allies at all levels: Have a strong network of peers and attend local industry meetups and conferences. These are great opportunities to network and learn about new technologies and real-world problems and solutions.

Express your goals: It is important to take ownership of your career path. It means speaking out clearly and standing up for your own interests.

Read: Cybersecurity: Are we doing it the right way?

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Jon Burket discovers, capitalizes on a new passion | West Orange Times & Observer https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/jon-burket-discovers-capitalizes-on-a-new-passion-west-orange-times-observer/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/jon-burket-discovers-capitalizes-on-a-new-passion-west-orange-times-observer/ Never in his wildest dreams did Winter Garden resident Jon Burket imagine himself becoming a photographer. Today, the 39-year-old has become a household name in Winter Garden and beyond for his captivating local photography featured at numerous businesses and institutions across the city. Burket currently has five prints hanging in Winter Garden Town Hall as […]]]>

Never in his wildest dreams did Winter Garden resident Jon Burket imagine himself becoming a photographer.

Today, the 39-year-old has become a household name in Winter Garden and beyond for his captivating local photography featured at numerous businesses and institutions across the city.

Burket currently has five prints hanging in Winter Garden Town Hall as part of the Historic Preservation Month exhibit; two prints at the SOBO Art Gallery as part of the “About Face” exhibition; as well as prints in Main House Market, Pammie’s Sammies and even the homes of local residents.

Although Burket is known for several different photography styles – including pets, travel, portraits, golf, conservatory and events – he said his favorite by far was his interest in photography. wildlife and nature.

He loves being in nature and often wakes up an hour and a half before the start of the day to drive an hour or hike a mile just to see a sunrise.

“I’ll find the most amazing sky, or I’ll find a bobcat or whatever, and I’ll look around,” he said. “There won’t be anyone there, and I’m just like, ‘What a shame this incredible thing is happening, and I’m the only person here. I love trying to capture that second of a moment and share it, so it’s never wasted.

Remarkably, Burket has only been doing professional photography for about a year. But his story is a series of strange coincidences.

NEW BEGINNING

Burket credits the start of her new life journey to her haircut in 2004.

His big afro-like hairstyle was perfect for his music-focused career path – at the time – and caught the attention of many, including a man who invited him to his recording studio in the Home state of Burket, Pennsylvania.

“If any of those things hadn’t happened, I wouldn’t be here,” Burket said with a laugh.

He was completing his final year of college as a vocal specialist studying music when he began spending time learning the production side of business at the studio. The guys explained that they were turning the studio into the Pennsylvania Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences and offered to attend for free if he stayed in the area.

Burket jumped at the chance. He found an apartment and worked in a mobile phone shop while he studied.

In 2008, one of his clients gave him a gift card to play golf as a thank you. He admitted he was going to give the card away – he had never played golf – but decided to give it a try instead. He was hooked.

Soon after, he and his ex-wife decided to move to Washington, DC when she found a new job. Burket said he took his new love of golf with him.

Although he was unable to find a job as a sound engineer, Burket got a part-time job at Sirius XM radio, where he started as an on-board operator for the PGA Tour. He soon moved on to producing live tournament coverage for the network.

In 2011, he got a call from his former PGA boss who had been hired by the Golf Channel to start a show called Morning Drive. He invited Burket to come to Orlando to work for him. Burket was going through a divorce and knew it was time to start over.

Although he lived in Hunter’s Creek at the time, Burket said he always loved downtown Winter Garden.

He worked with Golf Channel for several years. Then, in 2020, the station announced it was moving to Stamford, Connecticut, and laid off most of its employees, including Burket.

Burket decided to start his career over from scratch.

EMERGING TALENTS

As far back as Burket can remember, his mother loved carrying around a camera. It was not about capturing an image artistically but about impressing a moment.

The Winter Garden resident said he remembers carrying disposable cameras around college, but didn’t get his first camera until 2004 while studying music at abroad in Salzburg, Austria.

Burket said he had a teacher who challenged them to a photo contest. He took a photo through a circular iron balustrade to a cathedral, a moment which the professor said “brought him to tears”.

“It was really cool to see a photo I took elicit an emotional reaction from someone,” Burket said.

He never would have thought that almost 20 years later he would make it as a profession.

PICTURESQUE PHOTOGRAPHY

Although photography has always been something Burket thought he was “only a little good at”, with family and friends telling her he was talented, she has now taken a new dimension.

“It’s kind of like when people audition for ‘American Idol’ and they’re like, ‘My friends and family tell me I’m a great singer,’ and then they open their mouths and the judges go. say ‘Ummm no,’ he said jokingly.

After losing his job in 2020, Burket decided to take a chance and spent a few months honing his skills, researching and eventually buying cameras and gear to learn the science behind the perfect picture.

Around this time, We Are Winter Garden announced a photo contest with 12 categories, and Burket decided to treat the categories as a job to explore different types of photography. He went on to win seven out of 12. When he went to collect his prize, he met the team and a few weeks later started working with them. He is currently a senior producer at Minion Media Group, works with We Are Winter Garden, and freelances as a producer and photographer.

“It’s really great to be able to share my work with others and see the community respond to it in such a positive way,” he said.

His dream photography goal is to have a million Instagram followers and get paid for posting wildlife photos or selling tons of prints, although he thinks that’s not realistic.

He said many people have suggested he offer guided wildlife photography experiences or classes, and he is exploring that possibility.

He and his wife of five years, Robin, now live on the outskirts of downtown Winter Garden and often walk the area with their three white golden retrievers. They enjoy the variety of events that take place in the community, as well as walking, biking and exploring the outdoors.

Burket said he could never have reached this part of his journey without the help of Robin, who he says supported him as he explored this new career path.

Besides being resourceful and using free tools, Burket said anyone interested in photography just has to be willing to put in the time.

“Learn your camera inside and out,” he said. “Have it with you all the time, because you never know when something special will happen in front of you. It takes patience, anticipation, determination, awareness and sometimes luck. You have to accept that some days you won’t see much or might even miss an epic shot for one reason or another. These near misses are hard for me to let go of, but if you keep putting yourself in position, the moments and the opportunities will eventually appear.


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Elsie Bowie Harber – The Claremont COURIER https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/elsie-bowie-harber-the-claremont-courier/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 22:36:52 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/elsie-bowie-harber-the-claremont-courier/ Grandmother, teacher, writer, traveler, activist Longtime Claremont resident Elsie Bowie Harber passed away peacefully in bed early Wednesday morning, May 4, at the Pilgrim Place Retirement Community Health Services Center. A resident pilgrim since 2003, she was 89 and had lived in Claremont for 54 years. Elsie was born in Louisville, Kentucky in 1932 to […]]]>

Grandmother, teacher, writer, traveler, activist

Longtime Claremont resident Elsie Bowie Harber passed away peacefully in bed early Wednesday morning, May 4, at the Pilgrim Place Retirement Community Health Services Center. A resident pilgrim since 2003, she was 89 and had lived in Claremont for 54 years.

Elsie was born in Louisville, Kentucky in 1932 to James L. Bowie, Jr. and Elsie W. Bowie. James worked for Standard Oil and was a watch captain during World War II. At 23 years older than her mother, her father retired when young Elsie was 12. In an unusual role reversal for the time, her mother returned to full-time teaching and her father stayed home during the teenage years of her and her younger sister Alice. for them a career path in teaching as well as an active retirement in public service.

She grew up in a warm house heated with coal that her father shoveled; family meals included fruits from an abundant victory garden tended by his mother; and his childhood was rich with love for family, friends, the church community and recognition of his exceptional scholarship and musical abilities at the piano. She showed a love of literature at an early age and identified herself as a writer, composing poems in elementary school and articles for the high school newspaper.

Reflecting on adulthood, she wrote that her hometown of Louisville was “a river town whose inhabitants had a penchant both for staying, deterred by the falls of the Ohio River, and for advancing facilitated by the locks of the channel”. She hit the locks, earned degrees in English and history from the University of Kentucky, and took a year-long teaching job at the Stuart Robinson School, a Presbyterian mission school in an impoverished area. from the hills of eastern Kentucky.

Descended from a long line of Presbyterians, she pursued graduate studies in Christian education at Princeton Theological Seminary with her college sweetheart and fellow seminarian Joseph J. “Jay” Harber. They married in 1955 and, like many young wives of the time, she followed her husband’s path to school teaching elementary school until she was fired from the school district of Hightstown, New Jersey in 1959 for being visibly pregnant.

She supported Jay as a pastor’s wife (“two for the price of one” was the sad clergy joke of the day) in several parishes in Washington, D.C. and Charlottesville, Virginia, the last and longest urban ministry at Claremont Avenue Presbyterian Church. in Jersey City, New Jersey. Together they deepened their involvement in the civil rights struggle while raising two children, James J. “Jim” Harber and Elizabeth E. “Beth” Harber.

In early 1964, she stayed home with the children to allow her husband to travel with other pastors and rabbis to Hattiesburg, Mississippi, to protest the unjust suffrage of black residents. In 1965, the couple expanded their urban ministry by creating and running a preschool program that later grew into a better-funded program called Head Start.

The Claremont Avenue Presbyterian Church parish was planning a cross-country camping trip/move in a Volkswagen bus affectionately called by the family “a boxcar” to the town of Claremont, California. Returning to teaching at the Pomona Unified School District, she worked at all levels through high school, held department and district leadership positions, and revamped Garey High School’s English program to better serve and reflect the increasing diversity of the student population. She loved her students and took pride in helping them develop language and writing skills to launch them into trades, careers and college. She was an early adopter of the Apples for Teachers program which donated an Apple IIe computer and printer in 1984. She pursued her own education and in 1976 earned a graduate degree in Liberal Studies from Claremont Graduate School (now Claremont Graduate University).

Attending the giant peace rally at the Rose Bowl in 1982 and observing the influence of the Nuclear Freeze movement on the November election that year gave him reason to hope for a “renewed awareness of the fragility of this planet. “. In 1995, as co-chairs of the Claremont Presbyterian Church Peacemaking Committee, the couple authored the Declaration on an Inclusive Church, saying that “we welcome all people into our membership, regardless of race, ethnic origin, gender, age, sexual orientation, marital status, socio-economic status, physical or mental challenge. In 2001, the Pomona Valley Human Relations Council honored the Claremont couple with lifetime memberships for their humanitarian efforts, noting their lifelong activism for peace, justice, and racial harmony.

She enjoyed 30 years of retirement and traveled with her beloved husband for her son’s wedding to the German hometown of her daughter-in-law, Susanne Meyer, as well as to Mexico City, Greece, England, Scotland, France, Alaska and Switzerland.

All her life, she loved planning social events and family celebrations. Her family and friends will remember her as a great master of ceremonies, especially for her invaluable help in planning the annual Pilgrim Place Festival turkey lunch or setting festive tables for dinner parties. party in the Abernathy Room for his Sunday dinner guests. She enjoyed music, playing the piano, participating in the Church Bells Choir, and visiting concerts and theater in downtown Los Angeles. The couple were excellent cooks and traveled with Elderhostel to learn European cuisine. Many family vacations have been spent around a large oak table sharing their kitchen, especially when their two mothers (Jim and Beth’s grandmothers Elsie W. Bowie and Walsa C. Harber) lived nearby in Claremont in the 1970s.

She was a prolific writer of journals, essays, poetry, applied her skills as co-editor of The Voter, the publication of the League of Women Voters of Claremont. Beginning in 1962 and every year thereafter, she composed a letter that combined joyful family news from her children and later their spouses and grandchildren, with sobering concerns for society, the democracy and the world, formatted to fit the holiday paper it was printed on. . She remained ever hopeful and wished her friends and family that “your holidays will be full – of renewed relationships and bonds with the human family, and of lasting joy and peace.”

Predeceased by her husband, she is survived by her son Jim Harber, professor of microbiology and virology (Susanne Meyer, researcher at UCSB) of Newbury Park and Santa Barbara; his daughter Beth Harber (Henry Kay) of Baltimore, Maryland; grandsons Louis Kay of New York and Paul Kay of Charlottesville, Virginia; sister Alice; sister-in-law Nancy Harber; aunt Jeannine Kiser; and several nieces and nephews.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to the Southern Poverty Law Center, 400 Washington Ave. Montgomery, AL 36104 or online at https://www.splcenter.org/. A celebration of life will take place virtually at 2 p.m. on July 22.

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A lens to see the world https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/a-lens-to-see-the-world/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 15:30:47 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/a-lens-to-see-the-world/ Melissa (Haunty) Shackelford ’11 chose Bethel so she could participate in a wide variety of experiences and activities. And she took full advantage of the wealth Bethel had to offer. Specializing in communication arts and literature, Shackelford reveled in her involvement in the humanities curriculum, with faculty who were supportive and approachable. She found a […]]]>

Melissa (Haunty) Shackelford ’11 chose Bethel so she could participate in a wide variety of experiences and activities. And she took full advantage of the wealth Bethel had to offer. Specializing in communication arts and literature, Shackelford reveled in her involvement in the humanities curriculum, with faculty who were supportive and approachable. She found a sense of community through the Bethel Choir, exploring her leadership gifts by serving as business manager and prayer chaplain. And she had a life-changing study abroad experience. “Through all of my college experiences, I felt like I was developing a lens to see the world,” she says.

Today, she brings that holistic perspective to her role as Director of Curatorial Programs and Community Impact for Upper House, a center for Christian gathering and learning located on the campus of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. . Upper House provides a place for the exploration and education of the Christian faith – serving undergraduate and graduate students, faculty/staff, clergy, ministry leaders, market professionals, Madison’s artists and community. “We seek to integrate faith, ideas and communities with academics, the marketplace and the church,” says Shackelford. “We focus on integrating the Christian faith with different fields of study, issues of culture and callings of individuals around the world – helping them see the connections that deepen their sense of identity and purpose. and increase their understanding of how the kingdom of God is at work in their jobs and daily lives.

A typical day for Shackelford is a mesh of creativity, program development, staff management and community outreach. She can oversee and mobilize a team, plan an event and write a program outline, chat with a speaker, partner with another organization, or lead a strategic planning meeting. In Upper House’s dynamic programming environment, she describes her role as “translating creative energy into practical next steps” and says it balances her love of creativity and structure, allowing her to use the expanse of their skills and abilities. “I have a passion for harnessing a speaker’s expertise and creating a program experience that showcases the best of what God does in and through His work,” she explains. “Other times, I see a community need that inspires a particular program idea. For example, last spring I co-hosted a month-long art exhibit called UNVEILED, featuring the work of local artists, designed as a prayer walk for community members to get acquainted gradually with the arrival in our space after a year of pandemic. It is an honor to be able to serve the wider church in the city of Madison and to champion the kingdom of God at work in all spheres of culture.

It’s hardly surprising that Shackelford is also involved in many other areas of community service and creative initiative. Before joining Upper House as the third member of staff in 2015, she ran her brother’s art business, Inspiring Art by Alex, and together with her family founded the non-profit Alex Haunty’s Theater and Arts Fund, Inc., to create access to the arts. for people with disabilities. She currently sits on the organization’s board of directors, as well as the board of Inspiring Hope Ministries. “The arts have always been a significant avenue of growth and joy for me, including my time at Bethel Choir,” she says. “There’s nothing like creating something in the community, like choral music, that you can’t do on your own. And I think it’s important to make this opportunity available to others who haven’t had the chance to explore their creative gifts.

Shackelford is also passionate about relationships. She sees the myriad of connections God made during her Bethel experience that prepared her for a future she could not have imagined. “When you start college, it’s easy to think and hope that the path forward will be linear,” she says. “But that’s usually not the case. It’s also easy to feel pressured to produce and perform, but I think God delights in our process much more than the product. I have seen God reconnect to my Bethel experiences in the humanities, choir, and study abroad and integrate them into my life today. God wastes nothing. Trust God that what you’re investing in now is worth it, even if you don’t see where it’s taking you. You don’t have to be the one to connect everything. You will be surprised how God makes these connections for you at the right time.

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ENGAGE 2022: Pearls of Leadership https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/engage-2022-pearls-of-leadership/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 20:48:17 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/engage-2022-pearls-of-leadership/ This year’s AICPA ENGAGE event wrapped up this week in a hybrid format with approximately 4,000 attendees, about half of whom were on hand at the Aria in Las Vegas. Although technology is my main focus, the most intriguing speaker (based on the length of the notes taken) was Carla Harris, Managing Director and Senior […]]]>

This year’s AICPA ENGAGE event wrapped up this week in a hybrid format with approximately 4,000 attendees, about half of whom were on hand at the Aria in Las Vegas. Although technology is my main focus, the most intriguing speaker (based on the length of the notes taken) was Carla Harris, Managing Director and Senior Client Advisor at Morgan Stanley.

She talked about leadership and the importance of creating a powerful presence, which is as crucial for technology leadership as it is for business leadership. While leadership is often a “soft” subject subject to personal interpretation, Carla concisely delivered “Eight Pearls of Leadership Wisdom” that everyone could learn from in today’s transient environment of professional and personal uncertainty. today.

Over the past few decades, the path to success and leadership positions for the most part has been characterized by being a primary “producer” and outperforming others in your chosen field of endeavor. In competitive environments, leaders touted the mantra “my way or the highway” if you want to advance within the company. Carla said this thinking has become less effective as the expectations of new hires and senior managers have changed significantly.

Today’s workforce entering the workforce grew up in an environment where everyone was rewarded and expected participation with leadership, including transparency and feedback. If they don’t get it, they don’t hesitate to leave the company to seek it elsewhere. Combine that with the reality that the ongoing uncertainties created by the pandemic over the past two years have also caused many “seasoned” employees to question their personal career paths. While the turnover is most often described as the “great resignation”, Carla said it’s more realistically a “great contemplation”, with which today’s business owners must be in sync if they are to be effective leaders in this new environment.

  • Pearl #1: Being authentic is a distinct competitive advantage. If you use your intellectual capacity to promote who you really are, more people will trust you as a leader. It means being authentically visible, transparent and empathetic, which will engender trust among your peers, especially in these times of instability and confusion. Carla said being authentic goes beyond just showcasing your work persona, but also your private persona where your own interests, hobbies and skills will connect with the people you are trying to lead or manage. influence both inside and outside the company.
  • Pearl #2: Intentionally build trust. In today’s rapidly changing world where we compete on innovation and transformation, we will need increased collaboration at all levels of staff both internally and with external resources. To earn the trust of employees and customers, Carla said, you just have to keep doing what you say you will do, over and over and over and over again. Asking those you want to influence what they want, what they value, and then helping them achieve/get those things is how to intentionally build trust.
  • Pearl #3: Create clarity. The people you lead perform better when they know exactly what is expected of them. This includes not only defining what represents successful completion of the task, but also the timeline and deadline for completion, so that expectations are understood by all parties. If project timelines cannot be met, it should be discussed as soon as you are aware of it so that other avenues or resources can be convened.
  • Pearl #4: Create other leaders to amplify your impact. One of the keys to being a leader is doing leader-level work that ONLY YOU can do, and delegating other tasks to help those people develop their individual skills and leadership abilities. And then let them do so that they become leaders. Freeing up your time to focus on higher-level, future-facing initiatives is essential to being a more effective leader tomorrow than you are today.
  • Pearl #5: Build a diverse team. Times of transformation and innovation require a broader range of knowledge, experience and collaboration skills to understand and appeal to the increasingly distinct customers we have today. Millennials have grown up in increasingly diverse environments and if they don’t see this diversity within the companies they work for, they will find it in other employers where they will be more comfortable.
  • Pearl #6: Teach your team to innovate. Innovation is trying new things and taking risks. Taking risks means you will sometimes fail. Leaders need to teach their teams that it’s okay to fail when trying something new, and that failure can provide invaluable experience, especially when leaders are constructive and complimentary in the face of failure.
  • Pearl #7: Be inclusive. Great leaders seek input from ALL team members. Carla said asking each team member’s opinion by name, and then asking them to build on the ongoing discussion or present their concerns, makes them feel like they’re truly part of the team. the team and to lend its support to any solution adopted by the team.
  • Bead #8: Call a thing a thing. When there is bad news or bad behavior, good leaders must have the courage to report it immediately. Being upfront with employees and providing positive guidance helps maintain trust and get things done. Calling out a “thing” that other team members may also be aware of is motivating for other team members because they know they can rely on that leader to deal with these types of situations for the good of them all. all.

Whether you are a business owner, a member of an IT team, an accounting professional or an administrative staff member, future success depends on your ability to grow and manage your responsibilities, and being a better leader is as important as developing the technical skills that got you where you are. today.

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Roman H. Kepczyk, CPA.CITP, CGMA is director of firm technology strategy for Right Networks and partners exclusively with accounting firms on production automation, application optimization and practice transformation. He has been consistently listed as one of INSIDE Public Accounting’s Most Recommended Consultants, Accounting Today’s 100 Most Influential People, and CPA Practice Advisor’s Top Thought Leaders.

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How behavioral assessments can create a less stressful dental practice https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/how-behavioral-assessments-can-create-a-less-stressful-dental-practice/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 04:25:47 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/how-behavioral-assessments-can-create-a-less-stressful-dental-practice/ Effective communication is key to building trust, but what happens when the team members’ communication style and needs are not the same as yours? Behavior describes how we do what we do. It is formed by both natural (inherent) factors and influences from our upbringing and life experiences. It has a huge impact on our […]]]>

Effective communication is key to building trust, but what happens when the team members’ communication style and needs are not the same as yours? Behavior describes how we do what we do. It is formed by both natural (inherent) factors and influences from our upbringing and life experiences. It has a huge impact on our relationships and on our world.

DISC is the Universal Language of Observable Behaviour, a self-assessment tool that breaks down personality traits into four styles: dominance, influence, conformity, and stability. D styles revolve around how someone reacts to problems and challenges and how they exert their power. Style I involves people and contacts and how they interact and influence others. S styles stand for rhythm and consistency and how one reacts to changes in variation and rhythm. Finally, Style C is about procedures and constraints and how one responds to authority and the rules and procedures established by others.

Most people are a mixture of these four styles and each style has its strengths and weaknesses. While there is no such thing as right or wrong, right or wrong, when we understand our own mix of behavioral styles, we can recognize how others may view us positively and negatively.


Also by Jill Meyer-Lippert

Why it’s time to deal with employee burnout


While our natural DISC style makes us unique, it’s also adaptable. Adapting a style takes effort but can be used to your advantage. Becoming versed in the DISC language allows one to identify the four styles in others, providing the ability to modify behavior as needed and allowing for greater affinity.

Understanding DISC can also help identify an unhealthy environment that is out of style, which requires a significant amount of adaptation and stress. An example of this may be choosing a career path that requires a very different style to achieve top performance.

How DISC Assessments Can Benefit a Dental Practice

Create a positive team culture: According to the popular job site Indeed, company culture refers to the set of behavioral and procedural norms that can be observed in a company. These include policies, procedures, ethics, values, employee behaviors and attitudes, goals and code of conduct. Having an exceptional company culture can have a positive impact on your business, leading to lower employee turnover, more candidates and a better public image.1

DISC assessments coupled with debriefing help team members better understand their own behaviors and appreciate the unique qualities of those around them. This can identify why conflict is occurring and how to adapt to avoid future stress.

Having the right people in the right positions: All jobs require tasks for which certain personality traits are best suited. Recognizing the pace and communication requirements for positions in practice can help guide task assignment. Are personality strengths used to assign tasks such as OSHA officer, treatment plan coordinator, and calling overdue accounts?

Create better case acceptance: Building a strong relationship with patients is fundamental to a successful practice, and good relationships require trust. Simply put, people buy from people they like. This is true whether you are selling a tangible object or an idea. Recognizing DISC traits in patients allows you to modify your approaches and provide treatment and financial information in a style that matches patient needs.

Get positive reviews and patient referrals: A 2013 study from the Wharton School of Business found that referred customers are on average 16-24% more loyal, making word of mouth a crucial aspect of marketing.2 Building authentic and trusting relationships with patients encourages them to share their experiences with others who seek a similar connection. In a world dominated by online information, positive patient reviews and social media posts are a very valuable and free source of advertising.

Create personal awareness and acceptance: Exploring our own behavioral strengths and weaknesses can seem like a daunting task. It can be hard to admit that others may form negative opinions because of observable traits that make us who we are. But just as we must extend grace and acceptance to others, we must provide the same for ourselves. We are all beautifully unique, but we have immeasurable power to leverage our strengths and position ourselves on a path to success.


Editor’s note: This article originally appeared in the June 2022 print edition of Dental economy magazine. Dentists in North America can take advantage of a free print subscription. Register here.


References

1. Corporate Culture Guide. In effect. September 15, 2021. https://www.indeed.com/career-advice/career-development/guide-to-company-culture

2. Schmitt P, Skierra B, Van den Bulte C. Do referral programs increase profits? Wharton Faculty. 2013. https://faculty.wharton.upenn.edu/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Schmitt_Skiera_VandenBulte_2013_Referral_Programs_2.pdf

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Barcelona transfers: The XI players Xavi could sell to fund his summer rebuild https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/barcelona-transfers-the-xi-players-xavi-could-sell-to-fund-his-summer-rebuild/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 07:09:43 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/barcelona-transfers-the-xi-players-xavi-could-sell-to-fund-his-summer-rebuild/ “The football is over now and the work in the office begins,” said Xavi Hernandez after Barcelona ended their 2021-22 La Liga campaign with a 2-0 home loss to Villarreal. Barca eventually finished second in La Liga, climbing from ninth, where Xavi found the club when he returned to replace Ronald Koeman as coach in […]]]>

“The football is over now and the work in the office begins,” said Xavi Hernandez after Barcelona ended their 2021-22 La Liga campaign with a 2-0 home loss to Villarreal.

Barca eventually finished second in La Liga, climbing from ninth, where Xavi found the club when he returned to replace Ronald Koeman as coach in November. Subsequent eliminations from the Copa del Rey and the Europa League meant a second season in three years without a trophy.

“A lot of things have to be changed to try to be more competitive and fight for trophies,” Xavi continued. “We cannot have another blank year. Many changes are needed. We need to improve and strengthen ourselves.

Some of this planning has progressed well; Agreements have been reached to sign free agents Andreas Christensen from Chelsea and Franck Kessie from AC Milan, while other targets have been identified including Robert Lewandowski from Bayern Munich and Raphinha from Leeds United.

However, picking players they would like to sign is the easy part – figuring out how they can afford it is much harder. Barca’s €1bn debts and La Liga salary cap regulations mean they can’t even register Christensen or Kessie until they cut the wage bill yet.

Barca sporting director Mateu Alemany, technical secretary Jordi Cruyff and club president Joan Laporta have made progress. Philippe Coutinho has already joined Aston Villa on a cut-price exit, while Luuk de Jong returns to Sevilla after a loan spell. There is no confirmation yet of new offers for Dani Alves, 39, or long-time injured utility player Sergi Roberto. Xavi would like Ousmane Dembele to re-sign but the France international is still considering his options.

The Camp Nou dressing room is always full of players that Xavi doesn’t want to use, but doesn’t want to leave. Between back and forth, Barca could have a 20-man turnaround this summer. For Xavi to get the team he really wants, a team that can really challenge for the top trophies next season, here is an XI the club really needs to move on as soon as possible.


Neto Muara

Neto spent three seasons as a substitute for first-choice goalkeeper Marc-Andre ter Stegen, making just 21 appearances since arriving from Valencia for €26million in 2019.

The 32-year-old Brazil international, once selected, reportedly left Barca 12 months ago but no attractive offers have been received. This year, the Catalan press claimed Everton and Aston Villa could be interested, as he was linked with Flamengo in January.

A return to his country of origin may make more sense at this stage. But with two more years left on his contract, Barca would probably have to pay him a hefty sum to make that happen.

Sergino Dest

Ronald Koeman trusted Dest during his coaching tenure, but Xavi was less convinced by the United States international, to the point of re-hiring his former team-mate Alves to play at right-back.

Barca would like to recoup the €25m they paid Ajax to sign Dest in 2020. The 21-year-old has been on Chelsea’s radar since the start of the year, despite not being not at the top of the list. Sevilla and Bayern Munich have also been mentioned as possible destinations.

Dest himself will have to be convinced to leave, like many of his teammates. He loves life in the Catalan capital and started building a house in the resort town of Sitges last January.


Dest has played 31 games for Barcelona in 2021-22 (Photo: Alex Caparros/Getty Images)

Samuel Umtiti

Barca have been trying to push Umtiti forward for most of the past four years, ever since suffering a knee injury to help France win the 2018 World Cup.

But no club has ever come close to honoring the terms of the exceptional deal the defender signed just before this tournament in Russia. This contract was extended last January until June 2026, but it was purely an accounting maneuver to allow Barca to register their winter signing Ferran Torres.

Maybe a brave team will take the 28-year-old on loan but no matter what, Barca will remain responsible for his salary. At some point, they’re surely going to have to bite the bullet and pay him to leave.

Clement Lenglet

Lenglet enjoyed two decent seasons at Barca after arriving from Sevilla for €36m in 2018, but his form and confidence have waned over the past two years – as evidenced by his concession of a string of silly penalties .

Still just 26 years old, Lenglet should not be short of suitors to help him regain his previous level. Tottenham, Newcastle, Everton and Arsenal have all been linked with the France international in the Catalan press.

Again, there’s the question of a contract that runs until 2026, and Barca will do well to get back everything they paid for him. So a 12-month loan where his full salary is covered – allowing Barca to register Christensen’s free signing – could prove a suitable option.

Oscar Mingueza

Mingueza, produced by La Masia, played 27 games in total last season, mostly before Xavi replaced Koeman in the dugout. He knows he’s not in the manager’s plans for next season and doesn’t have big salaries that would tempt him to stay put.

The 23-year-old’s versatility means he shouldn’t be short of La Liga contenders. Both Getafe and Valencia are aware of his situation and need defenders this summer, although neither is likely to meet the €10m Barca would like to charge.

Riqui Puig

Riqui Puig has been hugely popular with many Blaugrana fans and pundits, but less so with the coaches as much younger playmakers like Pedri and Gavi have overtaken him in regular first-team places.

Xavi also made it clear that the 22-year-old La Masia graduate isn’t in his plans. With just one year left on his contract, he could be loaned out, but a sale for a small fee with a buyout option would make more sense.

Real Betis and Celta Vigo have watched him in the past, while Valencia have been linked this week.

Miralem Pjanic

The summer 2020 swap deal with Juventus involving Pjanic and Arthur Melo remains a symbol of the financial ‘manoeuvres’ by Josep Maria Bartomeu’s board that left the club in such a dire state.

After a season on the bench at Camp Nou, the Bosnia and Herzegovina international played 26 times on loan at Besiktas in 2021-22, although he last completed 90 minutes in February.

Inter Milan and Napoli may now be keen to bring the 32-year-old back to Serie A, but he is unlikely to match the salary on his current deal which still has two lucrative years to run.

“At the moment I see myself staying two more years at Barcelona and finishing my contract,” Pjanic said last week. “We’ll see. Never say never.”


Pjanic was an unused Barcelona substitute against Getafe in August 2021 (Photo: Joan Valls/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Frankie de Jong

De Jong’s case is different from most others in this XI, mainly because Barca believe there are other clubs who will offer them a significant amount of money to sign him.

That’s why some at Camp Nou are interested in the idea of ​​the 25-year-old Dutchman moving to Manchester United, if the Old Trafford club will pay nearly the €86m he cost when Bartomeu was president. Xavi would like him to stay but accepted that some sacrifices are needed given the financial situation.

On international duty this week, De Jong said he ‘didn’t think’ Barcelona and United had reached an agreement over his transfer, while adding that ‘I prefer to stay with Barca’.

Francisco Trincao

Barca were already in a financial mess when they paid €31m for Trincao in January 2020. They wanted to sell him last summer but had to send him on loan to Wolverhampton Wanderers instead.

After Barcelona loaned Adama Traore to Wolves in January, the deal was expected to be permanent this summer, with Trincao staying long-term at Molineux and both players valued at around €30m.

Laporta said last week it could still happen, although the president admitted such swap deals don’t really help the club cope with La Liga’s salary cap rules. Wolves may also not want to spend so much on a player who managed two goals and one assist in 28 Premier League games last season.

Trincao’s former club Sporting Lisbon are interested in taking him on loan but it wouldn’t be so attractive for Barca.

Martin Braithwaite

Braithwaite is another who has been told he is not in Xavi’s plans. After returning from injury in January, the Denmark international was only allowed 10 minutes of playing time in the second half of the season.

Barca are hoping Braithwaite will want to get playing time ahead of November’s World Cup, and they would agree to a fee of around half of the €18m they paid for him at the start of 2020.

However, after charting his entire career path so carefully to reach the Camp Nou, Braithwaite still believes he can convince Xavi to give him a chance.

“I’m having a lot of fun at Barcelona,” he told Danish publication Bold this week. “I haven’t played much, but we have a good coach and I know I’ll probably get an opportunity if I’m here and keep working hard.”

Memphis Depay

Depay has had a rocky season after arriving on a free transfer from Lyon last summer, and 13 goals in 38 games in all competitions isn’t enough for a Barcelona starting striker.

The Dutchman’s case is not helped by his association with former club figures Koeman and Bartomeu, as the current regime brought in Pierre-Emerick Aubameyang in January and are now trying to secure Lewandowski and Raphinha.

Depay only has 12 months left on the two-year contract he signed last year, so this summer is Barca’s only chance to secure a fee for him.

“I feel at home in Barcelona, ​​I expect to return there for the new season,” he told Dutch publication NOS while on international duty this week.

(Top photo: José Breton/Pics Action/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

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The class of 2022 from Fresno City College prevailed. https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/the-class-of-2022-from-fresno-city-college-prevailed/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 06:19:19 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/the-class-of-2022-from-fresno-city-college-prevailed/ Fresno City College graduates at the commencement ceremony Friday night (June 3) at Chukchansi Park. Maria G. Ortiz-Briones mortizbriones@vidaenelvalle.com FRESNO Despite the challenges of graduating during the COVID pandemic, Fresno City College’s class of 2022 prevailed. This year’s class set a record for FCC Commencement with 2,585 students graduating with an associate degree. In 2021, […]]]>

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Fresno City College graduates at the commencement ceremony Friday night (June 3) at Chukchansi Park.

mortizbriones@vidaenelvalle.com

Despite the challenges of graduating during the COVID pandemic, Fresno City College’s class of 2022 prevailed.

This year’s class set a record for FCC Commencement with 2,585 students graduating with an associate degree. In 2021, there were 2,443 graduates.

Family and friends celebrated the graduates Friday night (June 3) at Chukchansi Park.

Jim Yovino, Superintendent of Fresno County Schools, was this year’s distinguished alumnus and keynote speaker.

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Fresno County Superintendent Jim Yovino shares his wisdom with Fresno City College graduates Friday night (June 3) at Chukchansi Park. Maria G. Ortiz-Briones mortizbriones@vidaenelvalle.com

Yovino told graduates that everything he has today – who he is, what he does and what he has achieved – is because he attended Fresno City College.

Yovino called FCC a “magical place” that “turns enthusiasts into professionals.”

“And that’s where you’re all heading. Somewhere amazing,” said Yovino who attended FCC from 1986 to 1987 to take undergraduate general education courses.

He later transferred to Fresno State where he earned a bachelor’s degree in physical education and a teaching degree. He also earned a master’s degree in education from Fresno Pacific University.

“You have much to be proud of. All the graduates here tonight. You did it. You have successfully completed the trip. And especially, if not completely, during a pandemic when the way we were to teach and learn has been redesigned, redesigned and re-engaged,” Yovino said.

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Fresno City College graduates at the commencement ceremony Friday night (June 3) at Chukchansi Park. Maria G. Ortiz-Briones mortizbriones@vidaenelvalle.com

During his speech, Yovino shared with the graduates a few things that made a difference for him, such as finding his “why”.

After graduating from high school and going to Fresno State for a few years, Yovino said he had no sense of direction or purpose and eventually gave up and went. opened his own business.

And it was in his late twenties that he was asked to help coach high school football, which made him realize that he loved working with children, finding his passion. But to be a full-time coach and teacher, he had to go back to school and started taking night classes at Fresno City College.

Although he was scared at first and unsure if he belonged, thanks to the teachers and staff at FCC who instilled his confidence in him, Yovino said he made it through, taking the classes he needed to transfer to Fresno State and get his bachelor’s degree. diploma and teaching title.

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Dr. Marlon Hall, Acting President of Fresno City College, with this year’s Dean’s Medal recipients. Maria G. Ortiz-Briones mortizbriones@vidaenelvalle.com

Yovino told graduates that whatever they choose to do after graduation is to be the “best at everything” and to do it to the best of their abilities and to be at background, to work hard and above all to be kind.

“Kindness will always prevail,” he said. “And anyone can do both of those things. Above all, be nice. And the world, as we’ve seen, needs more kind people…and I hope that’s you.

The third thing he shared with graduates is to find a mentor or mentors, who are willing to help them grow, who will challenge them and tell them when they are wrong.

“Seek advice from those you respect. Those who work hard and are kind. They won’t cheat on you,” he said, adding that it is important to always remember where they come from and to remembering their roots, the struggles and sacrifices of their families and friends.

“Because you didn’t come to this place alone,” he said, adding that wherever they go, they come back to help shape the future of their community.

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Among the Fresno City College graduates on Friday night (June 3) at Chukchansi Park were Aaliyah Jennie Ávalos, 21, and Koleen Madrigal, 20. Maria G. Ortiz-Briones mortizbriones@vidaenelvalle.com

Among the graduates were Koleen Madrigal, 20, and Aaliyah Jennie Ávalos, 21.

Madrigal earned an associate’s degree in administration of justice for transfer while Áalos earned two associate’s degrees in American Sign Language Studies and Liberal Arts – American Sign Language.

“It feels good to finish and then I progress and I’m able to do what I want and what interests me,” said Ávalos, who is also attending Fresno State to work on her bachelor’s degree.

Ávalos said working on her associate’s degree was difficult during the pandemic, but overcame those challenges thanks to her professors and peers “who are interested in the same career path.”

To get to the point of graduation, Madrigal said she also faced many challenges regarding COVID.

“Some of my family members also had COVID and died. So it was difficult for me to stay in school,” Madrigal said. “But I’m glad I stayed in school and got my AA as a first generation and also set an example for my younger brother.”

Friday’s opening ceremony also included a moment of silence to remember faculty, staff and students who died during the school year, including board dean Mónica Cuevas.

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Dr. Marlon Hall, acting president of Fresno City College Friday night (June 3) at Chukchansi Park. Maria G. Ortiz-Briones mortizbriones@vidaenelvalle.com

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UNC Selected for Joint ID/CDC Epidemic Intelligence Service Fellowship Program https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/unc-selected-for-joint-id-cdc-epidemic-intelligence-service-fellowship-program/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 14:57:10 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/unc-selected-for-joint-id-cdc-epidemic-intelligence-service-fellowship-program/ Led by Michelle Floris-Moore, MD, and Joe Eron, MD, this effort at UNC is one of 11 infectious disease divisions across the country selected for this pilot program launched by the Infectious Diseases Society of America with the CDC. Michelle Floris-Moore, MD, and Joe Eron, MD The Infectious Diseases Society of America, in collaboration with […]]]>

Led by Michelle Floris-Moore, MD, and Joe Eron, MD, this effort at UNC is one of 11 infectious disease divisions across the country selected for this pilot program launched by the Infectious Diseases Society of America with the CDC.


The Infectious Diseases Society of America, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has selected 11 infectious disease programs for the first Joint ID/CDC Epidemic Intelligence Service Fellowship.

With CDC funding, IDSA has launched this joint pilot program for ID physicians who are interested in CDC EIS. The four-year pilot program streamlines a career path for candidates interested in both ID and applied epidemiology training and begins with two years of ID fellowship followed immediately by two years of EIS training. The innovative training allows ID Fellows to start research and collaboration with their EIS assignment early.

At the UNC School of Medicine, this program is led by Michelle Floris-Moore, MD, associate professor of medicine and director of the UNC Infectious Disease Fellowship Training Program, and Joe Eron, MD, Herman and Louise Smith Professor Emeritus of Medicine and Division Chief ID.

The 11 ID scholarship programs selected for the pilot program are:

Emory University School of Medicine

Massachusetts General Hospital / Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Rush University Medical Center/Cook County Health

Stanford University School of Medicine

University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center

University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

University of Washington

University of Wisconsin-Madison

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Weill Cornell / New York Presbyterian

West Virginia University

Read IDSA’s full announcement here.

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Social background: Germany’s forgotten career barrier | Business | Economic and financial news from a German perspective | DW https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/social-background-germanys-forgotten-career-barrier-business-economic-and-financial-news-from-a-german-perspective-dw/ Tue, 31 May 2022 07:20:25 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/social-background-germanys-forgotten-career-barrier-business-economic-and-financial-news-from-a-german-perspective-dw/ In Germany, all doors are open to you if you work hard and do a good job. It’s a good idea, but unfortunately an idea that does not reflect reality. “As long as you come from the right social class” should be added to that. Talent and commitment alone are often not enough. It is […]]]>

In Germany, all doors are open to you if you work hard and do a good job.

It’s a good idea, but unfortunately an idea that does not reflect reality. “As long as you come from the right social class” should be added to that. Talent and commitment alone are often not enough. It is also necessary to understand the hidden codes of the elite. This means knowing how to behave, what clothes to wear, the right hobbies to have, and how to communicate in the right way to open the doors to the executive floor. In other words, socio-economic background plays a key role in determining the academic and professional opportunities available to you in Germany – and the degree of discrimination you will face in your career.

Discrimination starts early in Germany. “More than 80% of children whose parents went to university go to Gymnasium“, says Konstantina Vassiliou-Enz, referring to the most advanced type of German secondary schools, usually a precursor to university. “For children from less educated families, it is not even half.” Vassiliou -Enz is a journalist and founder of the firm Diversity Kartell, which campaigns for more diversity in the media.

A child’s school career is often correlated with that of his or her parents. For example, 79 out of 100 schoolchildren whose parents have a college education will go on to university, compared to only 27 out of 100 whose parents did not go to college.

In a US study, fictional job seekers with elite hobbies like sailing or polo were more likely to be interviewed

The many facets of the social environment

Education is just one example of how social background can influence your future. The socio-economic position of a family also plays a role. Do the parents have property? What kind of jobs do they have? Worse still, people born into a lower social class are often discriminated against for other reasons, for example if they are of immigrant background.

“Parents’ income and level of education are particularly decisive for educational success in Germany, and children with a migrant background, for example, are more likely to come from low-income families,” explained Vassiliou. -Enz.

Infographic: fundamental dimensions of diversity

A long journey to the top

Even for those who make it to the top, the very decision to invest in their own education is not easy. People who grew up in precarious financial situations often cannot count on their parents’ support if they run into financial problems, Vassiliou-Enz said. Sometimes they are the ones supporting their parents.

This means that not everyone can afford to do unpaid internships, for example. People from privileged social classes also often have better professional connections, which puts them in a better position to land those highly sought-after internships in the first place. People who choose to study must also ask themselves if they are ready to take on debt. It is a more difficult decision for people from a lower socio-economic background.

Simply put: “People from poor families have to take a lot more risks and do more to get ahead than those who were born into the middle class or educated middle class,” says Vassiliou-Enz, who herself grew up in what she calls a poor neighborhood. family. “I didn’t want to pay to go to college,” she recalls. Growing up in a cash-strapped family, she says, she wanted to earn her own money first, rather than studying and going into debt.

A social climber taking others with her

“In my case, it was because my parents had been unemployed for many, many years, since the mid-1990s, to be exact,” Natalya Nepomnyashcha told DW. “Of course, that left them with no confidence at all. And that carries over to the kids, who also feel like they might not be able to accomplish as much.”

Nepomnyashcha actually reached the top of the career ladder. But it was not a straight path. His parents had emigrated from Ukraine to Germany. Nepomnyashcha grew up in a marginalized area of ​​Bavaria.

She managed to leave the Hauptschulea type of vocational secondary school in Germany, at the Realschuleone step below Gymnasium. Despite her good grades, however, she was not accepted into the Gymnasium. After graduating from high school, she pursued vocational training and a master’s degree in the UK. Today, Nepomnyashcha works for a renowned management consulting firm and, in parallel, founded the organization Netzwerk Chancen, which helps young people from disadvantaged social classes to advance their careers.

“It’s absolutely fundamental to start by letting go of what you or someone else has been told that you’re not good enough, that you’ll never get a good job,” she says today. today, speaking from his own experience. “It’s important to realize what your talents are, what your strengths are, what jobs you enjoy.” Netzwerk Chancen helps young people from difficult social backgrounds navigate every step of their career path by offering free coaching, workshops, mentoring and job search assistance.

Natalya Nepomnyashcha

Social origin is an important aspect of diversity in the workplace, says Natalya Nepomnyashcha of Netzwerk Chancen

More social diversity in companies

Preventing discrimination based on social origin requires more than supporting those affected. Obstacles must also be removed, to begin with. Most people probably don’t feel like they discriminate against people from a different social background. However, studies show that people tend to favor those who are like them, a phenomenon known as unconscious bias.

Discrimination based on social class can be more difficult to recognize than discrimination based on age, skin color or migration background, for example. It is therefore all the more important that people in educational institutions and human resources departments are trained to reflect on this aspect and to take a critical look at their own actions.

It starts, for example, with job offers, says Nepomnyashcha. His organization recommends that job postings pay less attention to applicants’ qualifications on paper and more to their actual skills, as many socially disadvantaged applicants often haven’t been to top universities or don’t necessarily have a background. excellent grades, she said. They can still be talented, she points out.

A CV

Half of managers have experienced discrimination against workers because of their social origin, according to a study by Charta der Vielfalt

The German media are also considered to be relatively homogeneous and not very diversified at this level. Most newsrooms are staffed by people with college degrees.

“But now that is changing in some media houses,” Vassiliou-Enz said. Hessischer Rundfunk and SWR, two regional broadcasters in Germany, no longer need a university degree to be considered for their journalism internships. Now they also accept vocational training.

Even when the subject is uncomfortable, it pays companies to focus on diversity: According to a study by management consultancy McKinsey, 50% of Germany’s predicted shortage of skilled labor could be solved if businesses were embracing a more diverse workforce.

This article was originally published in German.

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