Entrepreneur – Goodbye Pert Breasts http://goodbyepertbreasts.com/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 10:30:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Entrepreneur – Goodbye Pert Breasts http://goodbyepertbreasts.com/ 32 32 Diverse group of entrepreneurs move to Tony Van Aken neighborhood of Shaker https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/diverse-group-of-entrepreneurs-move-to-tony-van-aken-neighborhood-of-shaker/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/diverse-group-of-entrepreneurs-move-to-tony-van-aken-neighborhood-of-shaker/ Chantell Hargrave spotted The Corner during a 2020 visit to the Van Aken district, the mixed-use hub of Shaker Heights. She realized that the shelf-lined section of the neighborhood’s Market Hall shopping area devoted to goods by local artists and manufacturers could provide an outlet for her new business. She had just started sewing cotton […]]]>

Chantell Hargrave spotted The Corner during a 2020 visit to the Van Aken district, the mixed-use hub of Shaker Heights. She realized that the shelf-lined section of the neighborhood’s Market Hall shopping area devoted to goods by local artists and manufacturers could provide an outlet for her new business. She had just started sewing cotton bags and stuffing them with linen or rice which is heated or cooled for self-care.

A year later, Hargrave sold hundreds of aromatic tissue packets and added another source of income during the pandemic.

And Hargrave is not alone. The Warrensville Heights resident’s shopping trip earned her company, SC Care, a place in an entrepreneurship program initiated by RMS Investment Group, the developer of the Shaker Heights-based project, designed to provide similar representation to the composition of the suburbs among its traders, restaurateurs and clientele.

So far, Van Aken’s umbrella entrepreneurship program has enabled 85 participants to sell products in the district.

Of these, 29 are black, 12 are minority (non-black) and 76 are women. In addition to rotating shelves in The Corner, entrepreneurs can operate two kiosks, and a food court has been dedicated this year to Ellie-May’s Gourmet cookies. Operated by Ivy Lee, the biscuit factory occupies space for a food incubator.

Jason Russell, Ward Director for the Van Aken District, summed up the diversity results by saying, “That’s good. Could be better. I’m proud of it.

Russell said that when RMS hired him to run Van Aken’s office and retail operations (the apartments are managed by the NRP group of Cleveland), he was told he would have to find a way to increase the diversity of rentals for the center.

As RMS and Russell, who is black and has a background in commercial real estate and town planning, leased retail space in the center before it opened in 2019, they found too few people with diverse backgrounds among the potential tenants. . Ultimately, they took a basic approach to helping people grow their own businesses to diversify the tenant list. The result was the entrepreneurship program.

The Corner is reminiscent of a town in the 1960s where local businesses and artisans can sell their products. This means that local jewelers, bakers, candle makers, t-shirt designers, and photographers have an outlet alongside other local and national tenants in the neighborhood.

“This is our farming team,” said Russell. To help continue the initiative, he recruited two Lakewood small business owners he had known from a stint as a Lakewood town planner, Dave Willett and Steve Semeka, who operate STEM Handmade Soap at a store in the Birdtown area. of Lakewood. Both artisans and soap dealers have extensive retail experience. After studying various alternatives and artisans’ collectives in northeast Ohio and other areas with Russell, the duo agreed to undertake the operation of a retail space under the moniker of The Corner.

Entrepreneurs who sign up for the program get a shelf for at least a month at The Corner in exchange for taking turns operating the store.

It’s not free. Participants pay 30% of their earnings for access. On the other hand, they have the advantage of working with the Urban League’s Small Business Development Center to help them refine their business plan. Participants also benefit from Van Aken District’s marketing programs, from its website to its social media on Facebook and Instagram.

When Van Aken launched the call for applications, he received over 140. Russell said RMS decided to process the first 40 in order to achieve the real goal of getting the store up and running.

Today, around 20 entrepreneurs are participating in The Corner at any given time. The are drawn from about 80 participants called “the community” by Willett in an interview.

“The timing (in the summer of 2020) was right,” Willett said, as the main venue for many small businesses, local weekend markets such as arts and crafts shows, have been closed. during the first part of the pandemic.

The Corner vendors reflect decision makers and entrepreneurs at various stages of their businesses.

In Willett’s view, the diversity angle has taken care of itself, thanks to the nationally known diversity that is associated with Shaker Heights, as well as word of mouth among exhibitors.

The fact that attendees take turns at The Corner was designed to differentiate it from consignment stores.

“It’s different than putting things on a shelf and crossing your fingers and hoping they will sell,” Willett said. “When the business owner is there, he displays his products separately and can interact with buyers. It’s more like a small shop where the owner can share his passion for his product with potential customers.”

Participants benefit in various ways. Matthew Gorse, who operates Nutz 4 Coffee, which takes up space at the Corner, said: “Van Aken is a high level place. When people see your product, it reinforces the brand’s value for my product. “

Gorse said he takes advantage of meeting with potential customers so he can explain how his product, which has a provisional patent, works. Essentially, Nutz 4 Coffee are tea bags filled with something like hazelnut, to take an example, that you steep in black coffee to give it a natural flavor. It does not contain any artificial ingredients or sweeteners.

Gorse produces at the Central Kitchen, a food hub in Cleveland’s MidTown, as the product must comply with state and local regulations controlling products containing allergens such as tree nuts.

“When I’m there,” Gorse said, “by running The Corner I can sell several hundred dollars worth of product a day.”

Some unintended consequences appeared along the way.

“The community formed by the entrepreneurs was something I never expected,” said Russell. “These entrepreneurs worked in silos. It has become a social network. It has become a community.

Hargrave said the district is displaying its wares to a crowd they normally wouldn’t be able to reach, such as three non-Van Aken store owners who have decided to stock their wares.

“It’s wonderful,” Hargrave said of The Corner. “The more important places where you see people of color, the better the chances that that person will benefit. When one person takes a chance with you, others will too.”


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Studios provide space for creative entrepreneurs | Job https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/studios-provide-space-for-creative-entrepreneurs-job/ Sat, 09 Oct 2021 10:16:58 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/studios-provide-space-for-creative-entrepreneurs-job/ Vonyale Williams decided not to prevent the challenge from focusing on helping other entrepreneurs promote their business and increase brand awareness. She and her brother Neil Williams have teamed up to form NEV Creative Studio, LLC, but a pandemic blocked plans to open last year. They secured a spot for Landsdawn’s studio last November, but […]]]>

Vonyale Williams decided not to prevent the challenge from focusing on helping other entrepreneurs promote their business and increase brand awareness.

She and her brother Neil Williams have teamed up to form NEV Creative Studio, LLC, but a pandemic blocked plans to open last year. They secured a spot for Landsdawn’s studio last November, but couldn’t officially launch it until April.

For months, the brothers faced the challenge of paying to rent a studio before officially making it available to the public.

“I had a lot of tears, yes I almost gave up, but I couldn’t stop because of my savings and my heart,” said Williams, who also works as a business and marketing analyst. Olympia Chimney Supply Inc. in the case of

“I just had a dream, so I will overcome all obstacles and keep moving forward.”

His studio specializes in product photography, social media management, video recording, web design, and Google Analytics for small business owners.

“We are focusing on small businesses, designers and entrepreneurs to take advantage of the space to build our brand,” said Williams, 30, of West Philadelphia.

“Our specialty is the overall creative aspect of creating content for your business. My motivation is just to see people win.

CrumpVision’s Kareem Crump uses the studio for his photo client. He took pictures at home and enjoys his access to professional places.

“It really helped me a lot when I established myself as a photographer and the business appeared on the map,” Crump said. “Now I have a place to go, and I can say ‘I’m in a professional studio right now’, and my clients love to come there too. It’s a place of business, so I feel very good. “

The versatile 1,600 square foot studio apartment at 26 N. Lansdowne Ave. can also be used for special events such as baby showers, reunions and parties.

Williams says entrepreneurship is in his blood. His family has operated a barber shop on 69th Avenue and Rodman Street in West Philadelphia for over 60 years.

The studio marks its second commercial venture. After years of working in a corporate environment, Williams launched Poise NYC in 2017, a digital marketing company for startups, nonprofits, and small businesses.

“Working hard in an American company made it difficult for me to move forward as a black woman, so it was like putting my skills to use and helping my friends and family do business. Institute of Fashion Technology in New York. Williams, who graduated from college, said.

She is currently integrating the services offered by Poise NYC with NEV Creative Studio.

-Entrepreneurs selected by the African American Chamber of Commerce

Studios provide space for creative entrepreneurs | Job

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Entrepreneur Narendra Desai explains how to balance personal and professional life https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/entrepreneur-narendra-desai-explains-how-to-balance-personal-and-professional-life/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 10:49:03 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/entrepreneur-narendra-desai-explains-how-to-balance-personal-and-professional-life/ Once in their life, each individual encounters the fatigue of juggling work and personal life. These two lives are distinct from each other, and respecting the distinction is the only way to live it. Narendra Desai, a lifestyle influencer and lucrative entrepreneur, is the epitome of success. A perfect example for many because he rightly […]]]>

Once in their life, each individual encounters the fatigue of juggling work and personal life. These two lives are distinct from each other, and respecting the distinction is the only way to live it.

Narendra Desai, a lifestyle influencer and lucrative entrepreneur, is the epitome of success. A perfect example for many because he rightly discerns the art of maintaining a healthy work-life balance. He says, “If you really want to have a calm and less hectic life, you should leave your personal life at home and your professional life at your desk.”

However, one cannot allow oneself to exist without tasting both lives. Work life keeps you moving and stimulates you to achieve your goal, while personal life brings you happiness and keeps you sane.

The two lives should complement each other, a thriving professional life will guide your personal life, and a happy private life will motivate you at work.

However, the pandemic situation made the bad conditions terrible. With the idea of ​​working from home, the professional is exhausted and the personal life is strangled. There are no physical pieces like before, and therefore people find it difficult to function with imaginary horizons.

Here is what Mr. Desai has to say about it: “We all have our feet stuck in the same bucket. Burnout will make things worse. Decide on your dedicated hours and play based on the weather.

Life is not easy. It has to be done. Physical and mental well-being has a huge influence on both lives. Hence, companies are now helping consultants to reduce the hardship of their employees in order to achieve their satisfaction and productivity without compromise.


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How arts education encourages influential entrepreneurs https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/how-arts-education-encourages-influential-entrepreneurs/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 14:27:48 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/how-arts-education-encourages-influential-entrepreneurs/ In theory, “art” and “entrepreneurship” are two very different disciplines. However, the skills acquired during the training period while pursuing the first form the backbone of the entrepreneurial journey. Recent research shows that children who pursue art are three times more likely to be elected to a classroom office, demonstrating their development of leadership skills. […]]]>

In theory, “art” and “entrepreneurship” are two very different disciplines. However, the skills acquired during the training period while pursuing the first form the backbone of the entrepreneurial journey.

Recent research shows that children who pursue art are three times more likely to be elected to a classroom office, demonstrating their development of leadership skills. works Owner.

This is just one example. There is a range of these desirable properties which evolve with the aid of the art. Artistic research is quickly in the limelight, as more and more parents, educators and employers are aware of it.

Here are some ways to help you understand how art can help develop influential individuals.

Conceptual thinking ready to use

Innovative solutions ensure the survival of businesses at a time when the market is inundated with large players. Entrepreneurs need to think outside the box and come up with ideas that captivate audiences. In art classes, creative and imaginative thinking sharpens the skills of these entrepreneurs.

One of the most valuable General skills This era is a strong reflection on design. Defined by IdeoU as a creative problem-solving process using a human-centered core. It encourages organizations to focus on the people they create, which leads to better products, services and internal processes. The study of art allows you to become a true thinker of design.

Product development

Most art projects require students to paint, draw or sculpt something early on, based on abstract outlines. Training in this direction will help students develop dynamic products in the future. As an entrepreneur, he helps people identify the expectations, wants and needs of buyers. Understanding customer preferences makes product development easier.

concentration

Entrepreneurs need to tackle several issues at once. Every entrepreneur should wear a variety of hats when running a business. Even the diversity of ideas can cloud your vision. For those with an artistic background, dealing with different things at the same time is not too difficult as it allows you to focus on the problem at hand.

Art students find it easier to visualize the results of different ideas, so they can choose the most suitable idea without spending a lot of time. It encourages visual thinkers who can focus on many tasks. Art even puts a person in a meditative state. Entrepreneurs have to make important decisions every day, Artistic education Encourage them to act prudently and rationally, even during the most stressful times.

Conceptual thinking, product development, and focus are just a few of the many qualities that impart arts education to influential entrepreneurs. It can be the backbone of a truly dynamic, creative and dynamic entrepreneur.

An article on how arts education encourages influential entrepreneurs was first published in TechGraph.

How arts education encourages influential entrepreneurs

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Entrepreneur Shreyansh Gupta gives encouraging advice to young dreamers https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/entrepreneur-shreyansh-gupta-gives-encouraging-advice-to-young-dreamers/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 05:22:16 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/entrepreneur-shreyansh-gupta-gives-encouraging-advice-to-young-dreamers/ India Oi-Oneindia staff | Posted: Thursday October 7th, 2021 10:52 AM [IST] Shreyansh Gupta from Uttar Pradesh, Agra, is a successful entrepreneur, digital marketing expert, content creator and one of the youngest social media marketers. Born in 2001, he walked the path of entrepreneurship at the age of 18. However, he worked hard to achieve […]]]>

India

Oi-Oneindia staff

|

Posted: Thursday October 7th, 2021 10:52 AM [IST]

Google One News India

Shreyansh Gupta from Uttar Pradesh, Agra, is a successful entrepreneur, digital marketing expert, content creator and one of the youngest social media marketers. Born in 2001, he walked the path of entrepreneurship at the age of 18. However, he worked hard to achieve his goals from the age of 14. If you’re wondering how he did it, we’ll tell you!

Entrepreneur Shreyansh Gupta gives encouraging advice to young dreamers

By school, Shreyansh had decided he wanted to be his own boss. The creative soul within him has always pushed him to think outside the box and made him a curious learner. So, at the age of 14, he learned all he could about the internet, social media and online promotions. From an early age, Shreyansh was aware that digital marketing was the future and he decided to focus on this area.

Well the boy was right, and his hard work paid off. Over time, digital marketing has become a popular practice, and some brands prefer it to traditional marketing. Shreyansh Gupta therefore decided to take his first steps in entrepreneurship and started his own agency called ‘DevelopXmedia Pvt. Ltd. ‘. At the age of 18, the entrepreneur created his agency and worked hard to expand it nationally and internationally.

From a client to 10 to 100 and more, entrepreneur Shreyansh Gupta has witnessed his success every step of the way. The trip had many setbacks, but his will was stronger. After the success of his business, digital marketing expert Shreyansh started a few small businesses under his parent company. All of these businesses are also doing very well.

For many young people who want to be successful, digital marketing expert Shreyansh Gupta is a source of inspiration. When asked what advice he would give them, the entrepreneur replied, “I would suggest starting today. Don’t wait for something to happen because only you have the potential to create and change a life. Believe in yourself no matter what field you want to venture into. Read, learn and be open to ideas. Be consistent and patient, and learn from failure. It may take months or more than a year, but success will definitely knock your door if you work with honesty.

Article first published: Thursday, October 7, 2021, 10:52 a.m. [IST]


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A local Indigenous entrepreneur prepares his pitch for a prize of $ 25,000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/a-local-indigenous-entrepreneur-prepares-his-pitch-for-a-prize-of-25000/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 19:20:20 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/a-local-indigenous-entrepreneur-prepares-his-pitch-for-a-prize-of-25000/ Content of the article By: Calvi Leon, reporter at the Local Journalism Initiative Content of the article A native London entrepreneur is looking to take his business to the next level by competing for a prize of $ 25,000 in the final round of a national pitch competition. Steven Vanloffeld, a London resident of Saugeen […]]]>

Content of the article

By: Calvi Leon, reporter at the Local Journalism Initiative

Content of the article

A native London entrepreneur is looking to take his business to the next level by competing for a prize of $ 25,000 in the final round of a national pitch competition.

Steven Vanloffeld, a London resident of Saugeen First Nation, is one of 29 entrepreneurs from Turtle Island (North America) preparing to pitch their business in the final round of Powwow location October 20.

Vanloffeld, owner of eSupply Canada Ltd., an office supplies, janitorial and industrial supplies company, was named one of four finalists for Ontario after pitching his company to the regional semi-finals on the 22nd. September.

“Honestly, I’m a little shocked, but I was hopeful,” Vanloffeld said of the final. “I practiced this pitch in the allotted time. Each competitor had one minute, but I didn’t want to overtake.

Vanloffeld was selected as a semi-finalist among more than 1,600 Indigenous entrepreneurs from Canada and the United States, including three others in southwestern Ontario, who applied this year.

At Pow Wow Pitch Final , he will have two minutes to pitch and convince the judges why he should win.

“It’s going to be fierce,” Vanloffeld said of the competition. “I mean, you’ve got the top 20, all the right arguments (and) all the strong companies. I think it will come down to: are you able to stick to what you say you’re going to do? With the prize money, he said.

In addition to the prize of $ 25,000, a prize of $ 10,000 for second place and $ 5,000 for third place are also up for grabs.

Content of the article

Like Vanloffeld told The Free Press in early September , winning the top prize would allow eSupply Canada to expand to 300 Indigenous-owned franchises across Canada.

“There is nothing that businesses don’t need to operate that we don’t provide,” Vanloffeld said. “What sets us apart from the competition is that we operate a drop-shipping model, which means we source directly from domestic manufacturers and wholesalers.

“We don’t have warehouses, which allows us to pass these savings on to our customers, which allows us to be very competitive.

The prize money would also help him strengthen what he calls “the return component” of his business.

One percent of its sales go directly to the eSupply Canada Future Leaders scholarship program, which supports Indigenous post-secondary students in business, economics, law and trades.

Four full-time employees and an intern run eSupply Canada, but Vanloffeld said he plans to grow his business “exponentially” over the next 18 months.

Until recently, there weren’t many growth opportunities for emerging Indigenous entrepreneurs and businesses, he added.

This is why Sunshine Tenasco, from the Kitigan Zibi Anishinabeg First Nation in western Quebec, decided to launch Pow wow pitch Seven years ago.

“Especially if you live in First Nations communities, access to capital is not the same as if you are Canadian,” Tenasco said of the importance of giving Aboriginal entrepreneurs opportunities for growth.

“By being able to present Indigenous entrepreneurs in this way, we are creating a place where you can come, introduce yourself and buy from everyone involved in the pitch. . . Our goal is just to lift ourselves up, put the spotlight on and say, “You’re awesome, keep going. “”


If you are going to

What:

Pow Wow Pitch, a national pitch competition for Indigenous entrepreneurs

When:

Final broadcast on October 20 at 6 p.m.

Or:

Register for free on

powwowpitch.org/pitch/


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Lawmakers discuss student mental health issues and entrepreneurial opportunities for Appalachians https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/lawmakers-discuss-student-mental-health-issues-and-entrepreneurial-opportunities-for-appalachians/ Tue, 05 Oct 2021 21:01:38 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/lawmakers-discuss-student-mental-health-issues-and-entrepreneurial-opportunities-for-appalachians/ FRANKFORT, Ky. (WTVQ / Press Release) – Children of all ages across the Commonwealth are facing a major mental health crisis. Student mental health professionals testified before the Interim Joint Committee on Education today about what the Kentucky legislature can do to help students with mental illness and suicidal ideation. Speakers proposed legislative solutions that […]]]>

FRANKFORT, Ky. (WTVQ / Press Release) – Children of all ages across the Commonwealth are facing a major mental health crisis.

Student mental health professionals testified before the Interim Joint Committee on Education today about what the Kentucky legislature can do to help students with mental illness and suicidal ideation.

Speakers proposed legislative solutions that include more mental health first aid training for teachers at all levels and more socio-emotional learning programs to prevent mental health problems before they start. A mental health workforce shortage is also a concern as well as a lack of funds to hire professionals in schools.

Linda Tyree, director of crisis response for the Green River Regional Educational Co-operative (GRREC), said the co-op is typically called into schools after the death or serious injury of a student or member of the staff. More recently, the GRREC has been approached to help students suffering from depression, anxiety and suicidal thoughts.

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a nationwide mental health crisis, especially for students who have spent most of the last school year learning remotely, Tyree said.

“We know there was a lot of exposure to trauma, stress, family stress and even pornography when learning online,” Tyree said. These challenges, along with the normal problems of adolescence, have taken their toll, she added.

Amy Riley, a school counselor at Mercer County Schools, said her school was gravely suffering from the student mental health crisis.

“There were weeks last spring, shortly after virtual learning returned, that we were assessing two to three students a day for viable suicidal threats,” Riley said. “Many students had to be hospitalized or closely monitored. “

Riley told lawmakers she works with children between the ages of 8 and 10 and that before coming to testify, she did a suicide risk assessment on a 9-year-old.

“In my own building where we employ a school counselor, school social worker and school psychologist, there are days when the three of us go out of our way to meet the intense mental health needs of our 600+ students,” said Riley said.

Riley said Kentucky schools are in desperate need of more mental health professionals.

“This is my heartfelt plea that, when making critical funding decisions, you don’t overlook the mental health needs of Kentucky students,” said Riley. “All the money and all the resources spent on mental health needs in Kentucky schools are money that will have an infinite return on the investment. “

Marsha Duncan, a socio-emotional learning specialist for LaRue County Schools, said that for the past two years, she has performed risk assessments on children as young as third grade, which was a first for her for more than 20 years in public education.

“The needs are many, but the resources are few,” Duncan said, adding that a lack of people entering the field of mental health and a lack of funding for schools and communities to meet health needs. mental health is a major problem facing the Commonwealth.

Duncan said many students are grieving. Some mourn the loss of someone they knew to COVID-19 and others mourn the loss of fun activities and normalcy. Children are also afraid of getting sick or losing someone they love, she added, and adults in schools also suffer from mental health issues.

After the testimony, committee co-chair, Rep. Regina Huff, R-Williamsburg, asked if the speakers had statistics on the youth suicide rate in Kentucky.

Comparing a three-month period last year to the same period in 2019, the youth suicide rate rose 57%, Tyree said. Last Thanksgiving, GRREC helped a school district following the suicide of an 11-year-old child. Tyree said it was the youngest suicide death she had seen.

Representative Shane Baker, R-Somerset, asked what parents, educators and community members can do about prevention.

Riley responded that one thing parents can do is get heavily involved in socio-emotional learning at their child’s school and advocate for a strong first-class socio-emotional learning program. level.

Tyree agreed, adding that first-level socio-emotional learning means that every kindergarten and first grade student participates in classes on how to express feelings, regulate feelings, and develop other skills. socio-emotional.

Although lawmakers cannot take legislative action on this issue until 2022, Representative Tina Bojanowski, D-Louisville, who is also an elementary special education teacher, said she would strongly support additional funding for counselors. in mental health in schools.

Rep. James Tipton, R-Taylorsville, said he will contact university presidents about their programs and recruitment for mental health professionals.

Later during the committee meeting, two Kentucky business owners expressed their vision of providing opportunities for budding Appalachian entrepreneurs.

Kyle Wilson, CEO of Boom Beans, and Nick Such, Executive Director of Awesome Inc. took to state lawmakers to describe a new program that would help launch start-ups for high school students.

The program would involve a social network and investment platform for networking and plans to guide young entrepreneurs. The nonprofit hopes that this will lead to the growth of more Appalachian businesses in the state.

“I think really giving these kids a place at the table and a conversation and really a network that starts in the Appalachians but can grow statewide is a big part of what the success of this program looks like. Boom Beans, ”Such said.

Some lawmakers applauded the new path to individual success while others feared the funding might look more like a loan.


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This food entrepreneur’s investors prepared him for everything from a major hub to a “shark tank” appearance https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/this-food-entrepreneurs-investors-prepared-him-for-everything-from-a-major-hub-to-a-shark-tank-appearance/ Tue, 05 Oct 2021 10:06:35 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/this-food-entrepreneurs-investors-prepared-him-for-everything-from-a-major-hub-to-a-shark-tank-appearance/ SORAYA VENTURE CAPITAL Darabi was on her way to San Francisco International Airport in 2018 when she received a phone call that stopped her dead. The caller was Phil Wong, co-founder of Misfit Foods, whom Darabi’s Venture capital company, TMV, had invested earlier that year. The company’s cold-pressed juice sales were falling short. He had […]]]>

SORAYA VENTURE CAPITAL Darabi was on her way to San Francisco International Airport in 2018 when she received a phone call that stopped her dead. The caller was Phil Wong, co-founder of Misfit Foods, whom Darabi’s Venture capital company, TMV, had invested earlier that year. The company’s cold-pressed juice sales were falling short. He had decided it was time for a change.

“I knew it wouldn’t be a quick conversation, so I dropped my bag, sat on a bench in Union Square and talked to Phil for two hours,” Darabi said.

Wong’s idea was to make meat products partly from vegetables. It would be a tough linchpin for the company, which had raised $ 1 million in seed on the concept of making juice from leftover produce that farmers couldn’t sell. But Darabi was on board. (She also caught her flight that day, barely.) Over the following months, she and her TMV co-founder, Marina Hadjipateras, guided Misfit Foods through the transition. The company doubled its turnover the following year and now sells its vegetarian and meat products through Whole Foods and through online retailers like Fresh Direct.

“With another investor, the conversation would have been very difficult,” said Wong. “But TMV was so adamant that they invested in us as individuals rather than the concept, and that gave us the flexibility and the freedom to be such a radical pivot like this.”

This is, after all, how the Darabi and the Hadjipateras operate. Consider: The co-founders named the company TMV, for Trail Mix Ventures, because they agreed to invest only in entrepreneurs they would like to “take a trip to the woods” with. The company focuses on special purpose businesses, like the Tinyhood parenting platform and Cityblock, a healthcare provider for underserved communities.

As an early stage investor, TMV specializes in helping startups bring products to market, offering a wide range of limited partners who can serve as mentors to entrepreneurs, including Wharton professor Adam Grant and former vice president of General Electric Beth Comstock.

Darabi and Hadjipateras are quick to unite portfolio companies, such as when Misfit was considering moving to a direct-to-consumer model and TMV hosted a meeting between Wong and the founders of Smalls, a direct-to-consumer food company for cats.

“They explained to us, in great detail, what it would take for a company like ours to be a DTC priority company,” Wong recalls. The startup quickly decided to offer its products on its website but to keep retailers its priority.

Prior to founding TMV in 2016, Hadjipateras helped lead the billion dollar IPO of shipping company Dorian LPG, while Darabi founded several startups, including the catering app Foodspotting, which was acquired. by OpenTable. “Marina shows insight to be a good steward of capital and a responsible trustee,” says Darabi, “while I have been in the entrepreneur’s shoes and have a high level of compassion for the experience. “.

When Misfit’s Wong was invited to appear on Shark aquarium earlier this year, Darabi knew she would have to put him in touch with other founders who had been on the show to help him prepare. Wong went on to win a $ 300,000 contract with Mark Cuban and Kind founder Daniel Lubetzky. And when Wong needed more capital to complete a recent round of fundraising, TMV introduced it to an angel investor who quickly wrote a check. “We are incredibly practical,” says Hadjipateras.

Yet nothing on Misfit Foods’ journey has been as critical as the pivot of juices to vegetarian and meat products – an aid that Wong will not soon forget.

“Anyone can stay by your side when the going is good,” Wong says. “But when the tokens are low, that’s when you discover your investors. Marina and Soraya have supported us. We wouldn’t be where we are without them.”

EXPLORE MORE Investors who are friends of the founders COMPANIESRectangle

Extract from the October 2021 issue of Inc. Magazine


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Entrepreneurship education program continues at the incubator https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/entrepreneurship-education-program-continues-at-the-incubator/ Mon, 04 Oct 2021 20:04:06 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/entrepreneurship-education-program-continues-at-the-incubator/ Marc Nickerson As part of its exclusive entrepreneurship education program, tech incubator Fredonia will host a “Getting Started with QuickBooks Online” workshop on October 8 at noon. Guest presenter Mark Nickerson, CPA, CMA, MBA, will discuss which subscription is suitable for different purposes, how to import banking transactions directly and understand basic financial statements, and […]]]>

Marc Nickerson

As part of its exclusive entrepreneurship education program, tech incubator Fredonia will host a “Getting Started with QuickBooks Online” workshop on October 8 at noon.

Guest presenter Mark Nickerson, CPA, CMA, MBA, will discuss which subscription is suitable for different purposes, how to import banking transactions directly and understand basic financial statements, and how to ensure accurate financial reporting with QuickBooks.

The free event will take place live and on Zoom. Guests are encouraged to register using the online link. The link can also be located on the incubator’s website and on social media pages.

“The Entrepreneurship Education Program provides entrepreneurs with practical and useful information and the opportunity to ask questions of presenters,” said Chuck Cornell, Incubator Director. “High quality, interactive entrepreneurial workshops like this one are a key part of our services and the programming we offer at the incubator. “

For more information, contact FTI at (716) 680-6009 or by email.

Mr. Nickerson is the owner of Mark Nickerson CPA PLLC and has over 16 years of experience with small businesses and startups. He is a professor and lecturer in the SUNY Fredonia accounting program, and also a client of the Fredonia technology incubator.

The Fredonia Technology Incubator (FTI) is an economic development program of SUNY Fredonia. FTI works with external partners to promote economic growth by supporting entrepreneurship and the development of new innovative businesses into successful business ventures


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Scottish gaming industry on ’30 year journey’, says tech entrepreneur Van der Kuyl https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/scottish-gaming-industry-on-30-year-journey-says-tech-entrepreneur-van-der-kuyl/ Sun, 03 Oct 2021 23:04:01 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/scottish-gaming-industry-on-30-year-journey-says-tech-entrepreneur-van-der-kuyl/ The games industry in SCOTLAND is still creating a “truly indigenous sector,” according to tech entrepreneur Chris van der Kuyl. The Dundee-based gaming veteran speaking on the Go Radio Business Show with Hunter & Haughey yesterday, credited Sir Clive Sinclair, who died earlier this month, for opening up affordable access to computers to a generation […]]]>

The games industry in SCOTLAND is still creating a “truly indigenous sector,” according to tech entrepreneur Chris van der Kuyl.

The Dundee-based gaming veteran speaking on the Go Radio Business Show with Hunter & Haughey yesterday, credited Sir Clive Sinclair, who died earlier this month, for opening up affordable access to computers to a generation of game developers today.

Mr. Van der Kuyl, co-founder and president of game developer 4J Studios, best known for adapting the hit game Minecraft for a multitude of different consoles, said: “Without Clive Sinclair, many of us in the The gaming industry wouldn’t be there – Dundee Today there are more game developers per capita than anywhere on Earth.

The city, of course, has become the birthplace of Grand Theft Auto, one of the best-selling video games of all time. And today, the games industry is bigger in terms of revenue than all other segments of the entertainment industry combined, he noted.

Mr. Van der Kuyl described Sinclair, the creator of the ZX80, the UK’s first mainstream home computer, followed by the ZX81 and ZX Spectrum, in the early 1980s, as “Elon Musk of today” , recalling how Sir Clive brought the manufacture of the ZX Spectrum to the Timex factory in Dundee.

Mr Van der Kuyl, who studied computer science at the University of Edinburgh, recalled how a visit to Silicon Valley in San Francisco had made him decide to start his own tech company in Scotland.

Mr Van der Kuyl said his Polish and Dutch ancestors opened him up to always ‘looking outward’ and striving to be an entrepreneur.

He started 4J Studios with his school friend Paddy Burns – 4J is a reference to Dundee’s famous ‘jute, jam and journalism’ nickname with controllers depicting the fourth ‘J’ – in 2005.

The games industry in Scotland, he said, had started to develop in the last decade, but it is the next decade when the huge economic benefit will come.

“It really is a 30 year journey if you really want to build an indigenous sector and it is important that there are companies that give money back to shareholders in Scotland as well as money that goes back to New York. . ”


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