Entrepreneur – Goodbye Pert Breasts http://goodbyepertbreasts.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 16:18:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon.png Entrepreneur – Goodbye Pert Breasts http://goodbyepertbreasts.com/ 32 32 Entrepreneurs present at the Tahoe Pitch Showcase https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/entrepreneurs-present-at-the-tahoe-pitch-showcase/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 16:18:08 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/entrepreneurs-present-at-the-tahoe-pitch-showcase/ The event, which took place for the first time in two years, was well attended.Supplied / Nina Photography TRUCKEE, Calif. — After a two-year hiatus due to COVID-19, the Tahoe Pitch Showcase was back in action. In partnership with Tahoe Silicon Mountain and the Sierra Business Council, the pitch camp and showcase allows local entrepreneurs […]]]>
The event, which took place for the first time in two years, was well attended.
Supplied / Nina Photography

TRUCKEE, Calif. — After a two-year hiatus due to COVID-19, the Tahoe Pitch Showcase was back in action. In partnership with Tahoe Silicon Mountain and the Sierra Business Council, the pitch camp and showcase allows local entrepreneurs to develop a pitch and then present their business or business idea to a panel of judges and an audience.

Six entrepreneurs were chosen from the pitch camp to make their presentations.

Business category:



  • Ansley Fender, Atlas Solutions, Inc.: A software platform for managing grant funds.
  • Craig Rowe, Jaguar Initiative: A program offering local internships for university graduates.
  • Daniel Feldman, Apres Pop: A flavored popcorn company.

And in the student category:

  • Emmy & Melissa, Smoothieverse: A smoothie company with unique flavors.
  • Isaac, Tahoe-Truckee Pet Services: Connecting Pet Owners with Student Pet Sitters
  • Sophia, Los Puentes Lingüísticos: Developing Intercultural Interaction in Spanish Classes

The evening was hosted by Jessica Carr of the Sierra Business Development Center. Each entrepreneur had five minutes to present their case, then the judges asked them questions. The presentations were quick to light up and gave a clear picture of the market each entrepreneur was looking for, how they would approach that market, income, expenses and the amount of investment they thought they would need to launch the business or move on to the next. level.



At the end of the presentations, the audience was able to choose an audience choice winner who received a cash prize of $250.00. Sophia Martin won the audience award with her very well composed and balanced presentation. Sophia also won the student category, receiving a cash prize and a professional portrait

Ansley Fender won the business category with a compelling case for moving grant money management from spreadsheets to a software-designed reporting system that not only helps grant recipients, but helps funding organizations to better manage the funds they provide. Ansley also received a cash prize and professional headshots as well as Chamber of Commerce and Lift workspace membership.

After a 2-year hiatus, the Tahoe Pitch Showcase was well attended and after the presentations the speakers were surrounded by the audience asking follow-up questions. The public judged the evening a success and were very supportive of the addition of young people to the program. The Tahoe Pitch Showcase is coming back next year, so start thinking about your new business ideas.

The event was supported by: Plumas Bank, Town of Truckee, Truckee Chamber of Commerce, Truckee Tahoe Community Foundation, Holland & Hart LLP, MOBO Law, LLP, McCullough Web Services, Pamela Hurt Associates, Lift Truckee and Nina Miller Photography. Mentors and judges also volunteered their time at Tahoe Pitch Camp and the Tahoe Pitch Showcase.

For those who missed the event, it can be found on Tahoe Silicon Mountain’s YouTube channel at https://youtu.be/E-sqIljTRpk.

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This entrepreneur launched a successful startup without all the risk https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/this-entrepreneur-launched-a-successful-startup-without-all-the-risk/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 19:21:44 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/this-entrepreneur-launched-a-successful-startup-without-all-the-risk/ CEO and Founder, Bob Eisiminger Knight Point Systems Team Bob Eisiminger is one of my favorite entrepreneurs, not only because he’s a smart, humble, and outgoing guy, but also because his trajectory is a great illustration of the moonshot moneymaker business plan. (Actually I have wrote about Bob here before—twice!) Bob’s path to success doesn’t […]]]>

Bob Eisiminger is one of my favorite entrepreneurs, not only because he’s a smart, humble, and outgoing guy, but also because his trajectory is a great illustration of the moonshot moneymaker business plan. (Actually I have wrote about Bob here beforetwice!) Bob’s path to success doesn’t follow the familiar tale of the Silicon Valley maverick who burned millions in venture capital funds to realize the disruptive idea they cooked up in their garage. Sure, those stories exist — see Amazon, Uber, and Facebook, among other mainstream household brands — but what you hear less about are the hundreds or thousands of failed startups that tried to follow the same path. . Also, not all of us have access to these sources of funding or, let’s face it, to these innovative ideas.

I’m here to tell you that you don’t need it. And Bob is proof of that.

Do not mistake yourself. Bob, the latest entrepreneur featured in our video series– started in 2005 with many valuable assets: an education at West Point, stints in the military and corporate America to develop his leadership skills and flair for talent, as well as the intelligence and drive to make things happen. But he didn’t have insane seed capital, and his product—a doohickey that turned electrical wiring into a computer network—wasn’t even his. Instead, Knight Point Systems established itself as a value-added retailer (VAR), essentially a sales operation that integrated service into its products. VARs are common in the B2B technology market because they help their customers adopt unfamiliar technologies quickly and easily. They require little more than a wholesale relationship with a manufacturer, some technical expertise, and a network of prospects. The barrier to entry and the risk are therefore relatively low.


“I’m not that creative and innovative, but I knew there was a segment within the federal government that I could take advantage of,” says Bob with typical humility.


Bob’s career in the military gave him insight and contacts within the US military, so he chose to market his products to the Department of Defense (DoD). “I’m not that creative and innovative, but I knew there was a segment within the federal government that I could take advantage of,” he says with typical humility. The problem? Although VARs are low risk, they also have low profit margins, and those margins don’t improve much with scale. Nonetheless, Knight Point Systems could build a stable of satisfied customers while building a positive reputation in the relatively small defense contractor community. Soon, customers demanded much more complex engagements, especially given the growing need to move or replicate data centers, those giant server farms that form the backbone of enterprise technology.

Applications running in these centers are mission critical and any downtime could result in millions of dollars or, in the case of the DoD, national security. This required creating multiple redundancies in any system, so that if one center suffered damage, the system could instantly “switch” to another. The problem? Many of these fail-safe centers were built too close together so that a natural disaster such as a hurricane or earthquake could bring them both down at the same time.

Bob saw an opportunity and invested in software that would streamline the process from months to days. The company began to focus more or less exclusively on this service, differentiating itself from its competitors by its proprietary technology. In other words, the service side of Knight Point’s value proposition became much more important than the product side, and the company was able to take on larger, more profitable projects.

A later software update made it easier not only to move a data center, but also to manage a data center’s capacity on an essential basis. With this development, Knight Point has completely transformed its business model. It was now a managed service provider, and its engagements with its customers lasted for years rather than weeks or months. In 2018, Bob landed the biggest contract in company history — an eight-year, $902 million commitment with the DoD — and other big deals followed.

As a VAR, Knight Point systems wouldn’t be worth more than a low earnings multiple, but as a managed services provider with a $1.2 billion backlog on its books, it was a target. very attractive acquisition. On his second week of Birthing of Giants scholarships in 2018, Bob seized the moment again and decided that his one-year goal would be to find the right buyer for the company, one who would provide his team with the same vision. and the same dynamism that kept them going. since 2005. A year later, almost to the day, he achieved that goal, selling the company for $250 million and walking away with a check for $132 million.

Are you hesitant to take your business to the next level because you don’t have the cash you think you need? Take a page from Bob’s book and scale down your ambitions, but the size of the steps you take to achieve them. Smaller steps reduce risk and present opportunities you might not even have seen at the start of the journey. What problems do your customers face? What solutions can you offer them? And how can you position these solutions to provide your business with steady, profitable growth and greater value? Let me know in the comments. I would love to hear from you.

To learn more about Bob’s story and how other entrepreneurs have built fast-growing businesses, Register for free how i did it monthly video series.

follow me on Twitter Where LinkedIn. Check out my website or some of my other work here.

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SCORE CDC Hosts Workshop to Help Current and Promising Young Entrepreneurs Succeed https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/score-cdc-hosts-workshop-to-help-current-and-promising-young-entrepreneurs-succeed/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 18:37:00 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/score-cdc-hosts-workshop-to-help-current-and-promising-young-entrepreneurs-succeed/ SCORE CDYouth Entrepreneur Workshop Flyer Young entrepreneur Kinyah Bean will be the keynote speaker. SCORE CDC runs a workshop for young entrepreneurs aged 10-17 and their guardians to help them learn the fundamentals of running a business. It has become quite common for young people to set up businesses. We want to make sure that […]]]>

SCORE CDYouth Entrepreneur Workshop Flyer

Young entrepreneur Kinyah Bean will be the keynote speaker.

SCORE CDC runs a workshop for young entrepreneurs aged 10-17 and their guardians to help them learn the fundamentals of running a business.

It has become quite common for young people to set up businesses. We want to make sure that they, and their tutors, have a good foundation and the knowledge to succeed.

— Rebecca Hutchinson, Executive Director of SCORE CDC

MEMPHIS, TN, USA, November 14, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — SCORE The Community Development Corporation is helping young entrepreneurs gain the knowledge they need to succeed at a Young Entrepreneur Workshop on Saturday, November 19, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. This free event is open to ages 10-17 and their guardians. Experts will speak on topics such as starting a business, setting goals, e-commerce, marketing, how to guide a young entrepreneur, and more. The Young Entrepreneur Workshop will take place at the SCORE CDC office located at 571 Vance Ave. Memphis, TN 38126.

Rebecca Hutchinson is the founder and executive director of SCORE CDC, and she decided to facilitate the workshop after meeting several young people who expressed an interest in earning their own money. “It has become quite common for young people to start businesses. We want to make sure they, and their tutors, have a good foundation and the knowledge to be successful,” Hutchinson said. “It is open to young people who are thinking of starting a business and to those who already have one. We want them to know that it’s okay to dream big and that their age shouldn’t deter them.

The main speaker of the workshop will be 13 years old Kinyah bean, owner of B-Chill Lemonade. Bean started her business when she was eight years old, and her delicious lemonade can be found online and at seven outlets in and around Memphis. She even wrote a book called “Chillin’ My Way to Success”, which chronicles her journey as a young entrepreneur and encourages other young people to do the same. The workshop will also contain a youth vendor fair where those with products to sell can do so and receive expert feedback/suggestions on how best to market themselves in this context. The SCORE Young Entrepreneur Workshop is funded in part by a cooperative agreement with the US Small Business Administration. For more information and to register, visit https://www.eventbrite.com/e/441924988537 or call 901.504.5392.

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ABOUT SCORE

SCORE stands for South City, a community of opportunity, revitalization and empowerment. Founded in 2017, SCORE Community Development Corporation is designed to intentionally and strategically implement civic engagement activities in the South City community at the local level and connect residents to opportunities that help provide them with the tools, information and the skills needed to empower themselves. . SCORE CDC’s mission is to build community capacity and promote economic equity while restoring a sense of community belonging, pride, identity and empowerment.

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KC entrepreneurs say the fight prepared them for startup life https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/kc-entrepreneurs-say-the-fight-prepared-them-for-startup-life/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 20:05:54 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/kc-entrepreneurs-say-the-fight-prepared-them-for-startup-life/ EEffectively communicating skills and experiences gained during military service can be a major challenge for veterans, said Zachary Oshinbanjo. Too often, this disconnect contributes to unemployment or mental health issues when a member returns to civilian life. “Many veterans may have gone straight from high school into the military and are now looking for a […]]]>

EEffectively communicating skills and experiences gained during military service can be a major challenge for veterans, said Zachary Oshinbanjo. Too often, this disconnect contributes to unemployment or mental health issues when a member returns to civilian life.

“Many veterans may have gone straight from high school into the military and are now looking for a job,” said Oshinbanjo, a U.S. Army veteran who served nearly four years as an indirect infantryman and forward specialist. to found a startup in Kansas City. “They need to talk about this military experience.”

A 2022 report ranking the best and worst places to live for veterans putting Kansas City at No. 32. The study considers key factors such as employment, livability, affordability and veteran friendliness. Kansas City ranked 57th out of 100 on the list, according to WalletHub.

Zachary Oshinbanjo, Vetelligence

“Kansas City has a tremendous opportunity to become a place that not only welcomes veterans, but gives them a chance to fight and thrive,” Oshinbanjo said, noting that there are several military bases within hours of Kansas City. “I would love to hear more conversations about how to make Kansas City an area where they want to be after service.”

Oshinbanjo Technology Platform — Vetelligence – was founded in July 2021 to help create a more diverse hiring environment for employers using data and artificial intelligence to build relationships with the military community. This followed his own experience applying for more than 350 jobs and facing the same inefficient process over and over again, he recalls.

“Beyond ceremonies like Veterans Day, there really isn’t a glimpse of what someone in the military actually goes through and is capable of,” Oshinbanjo said. “So seeing that there is this issue of reintegration into the civilian workforce, I thought there might be a systemized way to help soldiers communicate their skills as an asset to future employers. potential.”

Knowing the challenge personally, Oshinbanjo knew it might be easier and faster for someone in the veteran community to solve the problem, he said.

“I think it’s important to create solutions from your own point of view, rather than from a bird’s eye view,” Oshinbanjo added.

Jannae Gammage, US Army

Cultivate instincts, resilience

Jannae Gammage credits her success as an entrepreneur to the special skills she learned while serving in the US Army as a military intelligence staff sergeant.

Jannae Gammage, US Army

“I’m a military kid who also served,” said Gammage, the CEO of Foresight who spent nearly a decade in the military. “I was born in Texas but raised nationally, which gave me this unique ability to see the world and its problems. … I can step back and ask myself, ‘Is this really a problem? or is it a problem for the people of Kansas City, Missouri?’ I can approach issues with a more holistic perspective and take lessons learned from my position at war and around the world.”

Entering basic training at age 20, Gammage learned army commitment and discipline at a young age, she added.

“If you want to be an entrepreneur, you have to be disciplined because you’re your own boss,” Gammage said. “There is no one to tell you to get up and answer that call or to work for hours at a stretch to do your job. The Army has helped me understand what is important in life for to succeed.

Fellow entrepreneur and veteran Andrew Porter echoed Gammage’s sentiments about military life preparing him for the startup world.

Andrew Potter, approach, tile five

Andrew Potter, approach, tile five

“I started developing a business plan to open our first brick and mortar while I was in Afghanistan in 2014,” said Potter, the founder of RoKC and TileFive who served as an infantry officer and army captain for six years.

In order to open the first RoKC climbing gym in 2016, Potter relied on the resilient mindset he developed while in the military, he said.

“Training, going to war, working hard and doing physically demanding and painful things for years makes you a resilient human,” Potter explained. “Transition to entrepreneurship, I was refused by the first 10 banks and the first 30 investors to whom I pitched. If you don’t have the guts to keep going when everyone tells you your idea will never work, you won’t succeed as an entrepreneur.

When the COVID-19 pandemic shut down Potter’s business in 2020, he had to tap into that resilience to rebuild the business, he recalled. His time in the military influenced how he chooses to run his business, he added.

“It’s our goal to serve people equally,” Potter said. “We leverage what we can do as a company to give back to the community and to different organizations.”

Hire veterans

With about 19 million U.S. veterans reported in 2021, less than 10% of U.S. adults have served in the military, according to Pew Research Center. Veterans offer a special set of skills and characteristics that employers can’t find in other candidates, Potter said.

Andrew Potter, US Army

“Veterans inherently want to continue serving something greater than themselves; it’s fulfilling,” Potter said. “So when they find an organization or business that they can truly serve and love, it doesn’t matter if there is a skill gap. They’ll have what 99% of other candidates won’t: the ability to give your all and be your hardest workers, especially when the going gets tough. From a long-term perspective, veterans are dedicated to what they do.

With the United States currently experiencing a labor shortage, Oshinbanjo encouraged employers to give veterans an opportunity by scheduling an interview.

“In fact, go through the process and you might find that person is the best fit for your team,” Oshinbanjo said. “Maybe for some reason they just haven’t been able to spruce up their resume enough to get that initial attention.”

Whether it’s a large corporation or a tech startup, teams that don’t include veterans have a missing piece, Gammage said.

“When you have a veteran on your team, you work with someone who is wired to put the mission before themselves, who is wired to support everyone about them,” Gammage said. “They are wired to solve problems. …I definitely encourage founders to look for veterans to work with, especially in the early stages of the business.

This story is possible thanks to the support of the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundationa private, non-partisan foundation that works with communities in education and entrepreneurship to create unusual solutions and empower people to shape their future and succeed.

For more information, visit www.kauffman.org and log in to www.twitter.com/kauffmanfdn and www.facebook.com/kauffmanfdn

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Nominations are now being accepted for the first EDDIE Awards celebrating the achievements of entrepreneurs with disabilities https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/nominations-are-now-being-accepted-for-the-first-eddie-awards-celebrating-the-achievements-of-entrepreneurs-with-disabilities/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 11:15:59 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/nominations-are-now-being-accepted-for-the-first-eddie-awards-celebrating-the-achievements-of-entrepreneurs-with-disabilities/ Nominations are now being accepted for the first EDDIE Awards celebrating the achievements of entrepreneurs with disabilities There is no doubt that entrepreneurs with disabilities are innovators and creators with the innate ability to transform the world through their distinct experiences and skills. ATLANTA (PRWEB) November 09, 2022 Synergy workan Atlanta nonprofit that supports […]]]>

Nominations are now being accepted for the first EDDIE Awards celebrating the achievements of entrepreneurs with disabilities

There is no doubt that entrepreneurs with disabilities are innovators and creators with the innate ability to transform the world through their distinct experiences and skills.

Synergy workan Atlanta nonprofit that supports entrepreneurs with disabilities, today announced that it is now accepting nominations for the first EDDIE Award, created to recognize and celebrate innovative business owners with disabilities from across the country. The first-ever awards event will take place in March in Atlanta, with a specific date, time and location to be announced.

“There is no doubt that entrepreneurs with disabilities are innovators and creators with the innate ability to transform the world through their distinct experiences and skills,” said Aarti Sahgal, CEO and Founder of Synergies Work. “The EDDIE Awards are the first awards in the United States to shine a light on those entrepreneurs who use their talents to not only make an economic impact, but also to inspire others within the disability community.”

Applications in the following categories are accepted until January 6:

  • Entrepreneur of the Year — an ambitious and innovative entrepreneur who is leading the way for both their industry and the disability community by creating an equitable and sustainable business.
  • Creativity Award – an entrepreneur who impacts the world through any form of creative media such as art, music, fashion, film and writing.
  • Newcomer Award – an entrepreneur who started their business in the last 12 months and offers an innovative solution in their sector.
  • Social Impact Award – a leader on a mission to change their community and the world at large. Their business not only makes an economic impact, but works to address inequalities and address systemic issues.
  • Techpreneur Award – an entrepreneur who uses technology to innovate, change and expand the realm of possibilities in their industry.

To read the full application requirements and apply for an EDDIE Award, go here.

Additionally, the EDDIE Awards will include the People’s Favorite Award recognizing an entrepreneur who not only excels in their business, but is also a favorite of their peers and partners. Nominations for this award will be accepted beginning January 9, 2023.

Become a founding patron of the EDDIE Awards

Businesses and organizations have the opportunity to be a founding sponsor of the EDDIE Awards, helping to spotlight deserving and talented entrepreneurs with disabilities. Sponsorships are available at several levels, each offering a range of benefits.

To learn more about Founder Sponsorship opportunities, go here.

“Synergies Work’s mission is to bridge economic, opportunity and network gaps between people with disabilities and businesses,” Sahgal said. “Partner companies and organizations, including founding sponsors of the EDDIE Awards, have the opportunity to help support the Synergies Work programs which, to date, have supported over 200 entrepreneurs and helped launch over 70 new startups. We are committed to supporting one million new entrepreneurs with disabilities by 2027. As we move towards this ambitious goal, the EDDIE Awards are an important way for us to celebrate and recognize the entrepreneurial movement within the business community. We hope businesses and organizations will share our enthusiasm by participating in our award sponsorship program.

A video that tells the story of Synergies Work can be viewed here.

About Synergies Work

Founded in 2016, Synergies Work is the largest business incubator and accelerator for entrepreneurs with disabilities in the United States. The organization serves entrepreneurs at every stage of their journey, from ideation to exit. With the goal of building a world where people with disabilities belong, Synergies Work helps entrepreneurs with disabilities start, grow and sustain small, sustainable businesses. His approach is based on the fundamental belief that all individuals have unlimited talent, an inherent curiosity to explore, and a passion to succeed. Synergies Work received the Dave Hammis Innovation Award from APSE (Association of People Supporting Employment First) and received second place and People’s Favorite Grants from the Inspire Awards from the Truist Foundation. The nonprofit is also part of the Moonshot initiative in partnership with SmartJob and Enable Ventures which was announced at the Clinton Global Initiative. For more information on Synergies Work, visit http://www.synergieswork.org or contact the organization at synergies@synergieswork.org.

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From Military Officer to Entrepreneur: How GetGo Founder Toh Ting Feng Adopted a Structured Approach to Entrepreneurship https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/from-military-officer-to-entrepreneur-how-getgo-founder-toh-ting-feng-adopted-a-structured-approach-to-entrepreneurship/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 23:58:20 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/from-military-officer-to-entrepreneur-how-getgo-founder-toh-ting-feng-adopted-a-structured-approach-to-entrepreneurship/ Whether you’ve seen their cars on the road or tried one yourself, chances are you’ve seen one of GetGo’s car-sharing fleets on the roads of Singapore. Launched in February 2021 during the pandemic, GetGo has become Singapore’s largest A-to-A point car-sharing service in Singapore. From an original team of 10 to the current workforce of […]]]>

Whether you’ve seen their cars on the road or tried one yourself, chances are you’ve seen one of GetGo’s car-sharing fleets on the roads of Singapore.

Launched in February 2021 during the pandemic, GetGo has become Singapore’s largest A-to-A point car-sharing service in Singapore. From an original team of 10 to the current workforce of 130, growing and scaling a business is no easy task, but one that co-founder Ting Feng has taken on. hand.

Entering military service despite having a family history of entrepreneurs

Growing up, Ting Feng was surrounded by cars and entrepreneurs. His father was a first generation entrepreneur – a high school dropout who started his own used car trading business.

“Growing up, I never had any aspiration to be in the used car business, but I always knew that at some point I wanted to be an entrepreneur.”

It may come as a surprise to learn that Ting Feng chose to join the military profession after Junior College, instead of going down the entrepreneurial path. He accepted an SAF scholarship and was sponsored for study in the United States for four years and then served seven years in the military and MINDEF.

“I thought it was meaningful and exciting, and deep down I knew that if I wanted to build a big, meaningful business, I had to be a leader who understood both strategy and operations.”

From a giant organization to large organizations: moving from the public service to the private sector

After 7 years of service, it is not easy to give up a stable and promising career. According to Ting Feng, “It’s very tempting to keep staying…but coming from a family of entrepreneurs, I knew that eventually I wanted to do my own thing.”

After making the difficult decision to leave SAF. he could either help develop the family business or start his own. Instead, Ting Feng chose to go into the private sector.

“I knew I wasn’t ready to jump into entrepreneurship right away. I have just spent seven years in the public service. I didn’t have to be responsible for a P&L. I wanted to have more visibility. So I decided to take a more structured approach to entrepreneurship.

During his stint in the private sector (CapitaLand and Grab), Ting Feng moved from “national defense to real estate development at the cutting edge of mobility technology”. These experiences helped him build a business directory.

These are the people you meet along the journey

While most people think of entrepreneurship as something you jump right into, there are benefits to taking a more roundabout route. During his multiple career changes, Ting Feng has acquired many experiences that help him meet the challenges of starting a business. More importantly, it connected him and allowed him to build relationships with many of his core team members.

“Entrepreneurship is never about one person or even just the founders. It’s about the collective team that you bring together. Some of the relationships I’ve built have also paid off in terms of team building .

For example, its co-founder and chief marketing officer, Johnson Lim, and chief technology officer, Malik Badaruddin, were people Ting Feng had connected with while managing his family’s investments after his stint in business. GetGo’s product manager, Lionel Fong, was his college classmate who decided to move back to Singapore. By taking the longest route to start his business, Ting Feng was able to build an A-team to solve a problem together. And that problem and that opportunity presented itself during the pandemic.

Timing is important when it comes to starting a business

“Not everyone is lucky enough to find a meaningful problem that they are better placed to solve”

While COVID-19 was a tough time for everyone, Ting Feng and his team found themselves in a position where things came together to start GetGo. With the right experience, the right skills and the right people, the right time has come during the pandemic.

“Timing is so important if you’re trying to start this business. Maybe five years ago we would have been in trouble. If it hadn’t been for COVID as a catalyst, the technology won’t have been advanced. There’s a technical saying: sometimes if you’re ahead, you’re wrong. So we also did that at the right time.”

Seizing the opportunity, Ting Feng and his co-founder launched GetGo in February 2021.

Read also : From a $70,000 debt to founding Singapore’s #1 online home improvement media portal, the story of James Soh, founder of Renopedia

Scale from GetGo

While most entrepreneurs struggle to scale their business, Ting Feng’s experience through his SAF leadership days and work in the private sector has allowed him to set the company up for success when it’s about developing the team and operations in a structured way. From the original 8-person team to a 130-person company, GetGo has grown rapidly since its launch.

Even from the beginning, Ting Feng and the GetGo team dreamed big.

“You want to solve a problem in a meaningful way. That means you have to solve it on a large scale, so you want to start with the end in mind, or at least some milestones in mind. Then you have to plan and work towards it. How am I going to engage and organize myself and the team to solve this bigger and bigger problem? »

Since their first press release at launch, when they set their goal of 1,000 cars by the end of 2021, Ting Feng and the GetGo team have been steadily moving towards bigger milestones.

This includes realizing their vision of a sustainable mobility ecosystem. By 2030, they aim to add more electric vehicles to their fleet in Singapore while expanding their service overseas.

As we parted ways, what struck me about Ting Feng’s entrepreneurial journey was how his structured approach to entrepreneurship led him to his current place as co-founder of GetGo. Instead of diving headfirst into starting a new business when he was young, he developed his knowledge, skills and experiences so that when the right opportunity presented itself, he could build an A-team to attack the problem and develop gradually but decisively.

Read also : Koufu’s Story: Growing from a Café to a Conglomerate of Food Brands

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Shaping the education of young entrepreneurs on a case-by-case basis https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/shaping-the-education-of-young-entrepreneurs-on-a-case-by-case-basis/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 11:47:37 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/shaping-the-education-of-young-entrepreneurs-on-a-case-by-case-basis/ Bryan Legend seeks to reset the horizon line for entrepreneurs through his rags-to-riches story. Getty The value versus cost of a college degree for younger generations continues to be a hot topic of discussion in the higher education and business sectors. While the surveys cited in harvard business review and Inside Higher Education suggest overall […]]]>

The value versus cost of a college degree for younger generations continues to be a hot topic of discussion in the higher education and business sectors. While the surveys cited in harvard business review and Inside Higher Education suggest overall satisfaction with college-level learning among students, nearly two-thirds of respondents agreed that higher education is not worth the cost at current levels.

Add to the mix the intrigue of past and present entrepreneurs, such as Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg and others succeed without college degrees, and the perception that college is a necessary prerequisite for business success is changing. Many younger generations are weigh the costsprompting a growing number of them to consider skipping college in pursuit of their entrepreneurial dreams.

To gain more insight into the entrepreneurial mindset of those who have skipped the traditional educational path for business aspirations, I had the opportunity to interview Bryan Legend, entrepreneur and CEO of safuu. Legend has chosen to train through numerous business ventures and has recently made a name for himself in the cryptocurrency and decentralized finance (Defi) industries. His success earned him the name Money Central’s 2021 Technology Leader of the Year.

Like a growing number of other successful entrepreneurs, Legend doesn’t have a college degree in his pocket. But, for him, education can take different forms. “It’s time we started addressing the need for degrees on a case-by-case basis,” he says. “If I go to see a doctor, I sure hope he has a college degree, but many of the career paths available to young people today don’t require the notorious financial pressure or debt that comes with getting of a university degree.”

Legend has embarked on a journey to inspire many other passionate young entrepreneurs to pursue and achieve their dreams. Below is a condensed account of our conversation focusing on the role a less traditional upbringing had in shaping her success.

Rod Berger: Bryan, can you tell us a bit more about the backstory that got you to where you are on your current journey?

Legend Brian: My story is a typical poverty-to-rich scenario. I’m Australian and I grew up with little. I dropped out of high school three years before graduating and entered the workforce quite early. While others may have viewed my lack of a high school diploma or college certificate (diploma) as a disadvantage, it didn’t hold me back at all.

It gave me a hunger that most others couldn’t match. I decided to push myself as much as possible and see how far I could go. My first jobs were in sales and I discovered something new about myself while doing those jobs. It turned out that I had a special gift for negotiation, and this gift was mainly responsible for the success of my business.

I launched several successful startups during my career. I founded TWILX, a digital advertising company, and became a pioneer in Search Engine Optimization (SEO), Social Media Marketing (SMM) and Search Engine Marketing (SEM). ).

I eventually tapped into my love for technology and innovation and my strong desire to make a lot of money and got into cryptocurrency at first. This trip led me to Safuu, which has been my most successful venture so far.

Shepherd: Cryptocurrency and the decentralized finance space have seen an explosion of interest in recent years, not to mention a good deal of speculation. Share a bit about why you decided to throw your hat in the ring.

Legend: Well, cryptocurrency is a fascinating phenomenon of how technology has overtaken the traditional banking system and how it is at the forefront of challenging the fiat-based government. The relevance of this technology was what appealed to me more than anything else. As an entrepreneur, I always wanted to be in the center of the action, and cryptocurrency seemed to be where the action was.

A credible criticism of the crypto space is the unsustainability of many blockchain projects that have been reported. Safuu is my solution to this singular problem.

Safuu is the abbreviation of Sustainable Asset Fund for Universal Users. It is a DeFi protocol that uses blockchain technology by automatically distributing fixed interest payments using cryptocurrency. We have designed it with innovative concepts that ensure the sustainability and long-term profitability of the platform.

Auto-staking and auto-compounding are integrated via rebasing so that the supply of circulating tokens increases or decreases automatically based on a token’s price fluctuations. This sustainable rebasing mechanism not only offers the highest annual percentage yield (APY) in today’s market, but also considers ways to remain profitable even as it moves. This built-in mechanism is primarily responsible for why our users trust us so much.

Shepherd: Given the complexity and risk involved, cryptocurrency is definitely not an industry for the faint-hearted. Many readers might wonder how someone who lost their high school and college education got to the top of such a complex industry.

Legend: It’s not like many cryptocurrency-based certificates are available at most colleges [laughs]. The world is a big school. The internet is full of information and determination has a lot more bearing on success than degrees.

The best thing acquired in school is literacy. After that, it’s really up to the individual. Obviously, there are people who need to get degrees, but for entrepreneurs like me, it’s often more to do with street smarts, determination and a healthy dose of self-confidence.

Shepherd: How has your relationship to success changed during your career? Have you started aggressively proving the establishment wrong, and if so, has your perspective changed over the years?

Legend: Most people are sold on hope and belief and nothing more. They think they will wake up one day and notice that everything has changed, including the environment around them. It’s as if they imagined a big bag of money right next to their bed, waiting for them because they hoped and believed.

This way of thinking is naïve and far from the truth, but unfortunately, many people are of this mindset today. I also had the same mindset before I woke up and realized that things will only change through action. Belief and hope are powerful, but only when action is applied can our dreams have a stable tripod to stand on. I always say, “Belief in your belief will create the fact.” I live with them on a daily basis, but I strive to add actions so that these same beliefs become reality.

Shepherd: You are the classic rags-to-riches story that many are intrigued and driven to emulate. You have also dropped out of school to chart your own path to success. What was the impetus behind such a strong decision to oppose the traditional model of education?

Legend: After dropping out of high school at a young age, I soon realized that working for “the man” was not something I was interested in. Deep down, I felt destined for more. Through years of personal development, I discovered my business talent within the sales and marketing industry. I have since used these learnings and my skills in the world of cryptocurrency, where I found my true passion for overtaking.

I knew perseverance would be the key to making it all happen to achieve my goal of truly succeeding. It’s not how many times you get knocked down, but how many times you get back up and keep fighting with perseverance. It’s about proving to myself and to the world that success comes from within.

Shepherd: What would be your contribution to the dropout debate? What advice would you give to people considering dropping out of school and pursuing an independent path like you did?

Legend: It must be approached on a case-by-case basis. The world has gone digital and the number of opportunities available to young people today is incredible.

Many of these opportunities will be less juicy or lucrative in a few years. As a result, there will undoubtedly be those who decide to start earlier and perhaps forgo some formal education.

We need to re-examine the idea that formal education and credentials are the norm for success. Still, one should definitely avoid demonizing graduation, because success means different things to different people.

My main concern is for young people who cannot afford to go to school. I want them to realize that they have an innate intelligence and that if they are determined they can be even more successful than me.


Learning takes many forms and inside the trenches This is often where business-minded individuals make the most progress. Journeys like Legend’s are a benchmark for young people seeking inspiration as they chart their path as entrepreneurs. With a current net worth of over $26 million, Legend’s financial gains show how hard work and determination can lead to overcoming obstacles that lead to success.

For young people trying to determine the cost-benefits of traditional versus less traditional education, Legend’s story highlights the importance of hard work, no matter the choice. As he describes it, it takes belief, hope and action to produce positive results – something every young entrepreneur can focus on tweaking.

Interviews have been edited and condensed for clarity.

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Raising money as a woman in 2022 – 6 tips from an investor, entrepreneur and scientist https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/raising-money-as-a-woman-in-2022-6-tips-from-an-investor-entrepreneur-and-scientist/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 00:24:06 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/raising-money-as-a-woman-in-2022-6-tips-from-an-investor-entrepreneur-and-scientist/ Top-Women-Entrepreneurs-Collage 2022- … [+] https://globalwomanmagazine.com/top-10-female-entrepreneurs-guiding-us-into-a-better-2022/ Women’s World Magazine Between the pandemic changing our ideas about “work”, an increased focus on values, and the resulting “great realignment” of careers, more and more women are becoming entrepreneurs. The World Economic Forum A 2022 study of the gender gap reports that “women created 49% of new businesses in […]]]>

Between the pandemic changing our ideas about “work”, an increased focus on values, and the resulting “great realignment” of careers, more and more women are becoming entrepreneurs. The World Economic Forum A 2022 study of the gender gap reports that “women created 49% of new businesses in the United States in 2021, up from 28% in 2019.”

Unfortunately, the path to raising capital for these female entrepreneurs is an obstacle course at best, as female founders only receive about 2.4% of venture capital funding, according to a recent study. Pitch book report.

There are many more female investors and investors looking to invest in women-founded companies than before, but the criteria they use are the same. This doesn’t seem to reflect how women “do” entrepreneurship, or what women value – or, in some ways, where the workplace and business have evolved in a post-pandemic era, 21st century, an economy centered on ESG. ESG focuses on the environment, social and governance, which relates to impact, responsibility and transparency, as well as the diversity of ideas and teams.

Business is still business and the purpose of business is to raise money, so female entrepreneurs who want to raise outside capital to grow faster need to know the ropes.

Here are six tips on how to prepare to pitch investors, from a female investor who has been there as an entrepreneur and a scientist, and is now part of the management team of a venture capital firm. , Ginger RothrockPh.D., from HG Ventures (from an exclusive interview on Electric Ladies Podcast):

1. “Do you understand what customers are looking for?: Rothrock advises asking this question as you prepare your fundraising approach and pitch deck for investors. She suggested understanding, “What are your customers saying?” She warned that many people don’t listen enough to what their customers really need. This is where the lean start method of customer discovery can help a lot.

2. Find the small niche to gain a foothold“If you’re targeting a market that has really long lead times,” Rothrock advised, “are there any smaller niche markets where you could get in faster?” She added that “there almost always are”. This includes understanding the supply chain and sales cycles.

3. “Do you know where you want to go? » Understanding how you make money is the first job. Then predicting what your finances will be over time, or modeling, can be the biggest stress point for entrepreneurs, especially women who tend to think they have to know exactly how to get to each step. way (you don’t know). Rothrock says to approach it in two ways: “The financial model is often the digital side of your story. It’s storytelling through the numbers,” she said. One approach is: “What are the key milestones you could achieve in 18-24 months? … Maybe it’s a pilot project with a company, maybe it’s manufacturing he on a certain scale, maybe it’s like building a team of a certain size….You have to have like a very firm goal post there.

“Then you take the opposite approach. Like, okay, if I had $2 million, what would I do with it? If I had $5 million, where would I go, if I had $10 million?…if I raise that much now, where would it take me?”

4. “You must list each hypothesis you have”: What is your supply chain? What are your fees? How will the market evolve over time? What will happen when the price of oil goes up or down? What new legislation or regulation will affect your business, anyway? What changes do you see in the market? How will the SEC’s new climate risk disclosure rules affect your opportunities or risks?

5. Tell your story: Tell your company’s story in words and numbers, advises Rothrock. “People have to get creative with their business model or their focus areas, their go-to-market strategy to try to show revenue upfront because ultimately, yes, we’re looking for returns,” explained Rothrock. “We want to see that you have a path to…real growth. And sometimes that growth isn’t limited to just one market. Often you stack the markets on top of each other to lead the way and tell the story, because it’s all about the storytelling. Explain what customers are telling you that verify this scenario, the “early signals that these are also real markets”. They may be smaller than what you are ultimately looking for, but your business growth story is a process.

6. Research the investor in advance and interview him as well: You also decide who you want to work with, pointed out Rothrock. She said the top entrepreneurs they spoke to were prepared to have done their research on her business and understood what they wanted from the business besides money.

“What would you do if you weren’t afraid?” What choices would you make? What steps would you take?… We (women) outperform men, we get better grades. We learn that hard work leads to results… (we often make) career choices because of a perceived need or what I’m supposed to do… (But) what if I could do whatever I wanted? is the ultimate question Ginger Rothrock wants us to answer.

Listen to the full interview with Ginger Rothrock on the Electric Ladies podcast here.

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Can hemp be halal? Entrepreneur explains how to tap into a $3 trillion economy https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/can-hemp-be-halal-entrepreneur-explains-how-to-tap-into-a-3-trillion-economy/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 22:55:58 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/can-hemp-be-halal-entrepreneur-explains-how-to-tap-into-a-3-trillion-economy/ Consuming cannabis is a practice considered haram (banned) by many Muslims around the world. However, a Halal certification could change that. Halal Hemp is a direct-to-consumer, halal certified, CBD marketplace serving Muslim consumers. oC-founders Ishaq Ali and Tengku Chanela Jamidah are planning halal certification as a way to access a market of three billion people, […]]]>

Consuming cannabis is a practice considered haram (banned) by many Muslims around the world. However, a Halal certification could change that.

Halal Hemp is a direct-to-consumer, halal certified, CBD marketplace serving Muslim consumers. oC-founders Ishaq Ali and Tengku Chanela Jamidah are planning halal certification as a way to access a market of three billion people, Forbes noted.

Tapping into a $3 trillion economy

“In order for this audience to feel confident in consuming a product, Muslims typically want to see that it has been vetted by a religious board and approved to be safe and in line with their religious beliefs,” Ali said. Told journalist Andrew DeAngelo.

“Our main activities are divided into consulting and certification services, organizing educational programs and conferences, as well as creating a platform for halal-certified brands to reach a Muslim audience through our marketadded Ali who was born and raised in Fresno, California in a Muslim family.

Ali explained that “the halal market is a $3 trillion saving” and that “halal certification is one of the cheapest consumer certifications available on the market”.

Additionally, with his past experience working in Policy for Eaze, Ali noted that “cannabis brands, in particular, are excluded from USDA Organic certifications (…) due to the federal ban, so the halal certification can serve as an alternative (…) halal certified (…) appeal to vegan consumers [and] are more carbon friendly.

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Beauty and skincare heavyweights named to entrepreneur’s 100 Women of Influence list https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/beauty-and-skincare-heavyweights-named-to-entrepreneurs-100-women-of-influence-list/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 20:07:36 +0000 https://goodbyepertbreasts.com/beauty-and-skincare-heavyweights-named-to-entrepreneurs-100-women-of-influence-list/ Every year, Entrepreneur Magazine celebrates women leaders who are influencing their industries, reinventing the future and defining culture. After reviewing hundreds of accomplished and inspiring women, the magazine narrowed the list down to 100. Included in this year’s coveted list alongside Jennifer Lopez, CEO of J. Lo Beautyand Kim Kardashian, CEO of Skims, a next-generation […]]]>

Every year, Entrepreneur Magazine celebrates women leaders who are influencing their industries, reinventing the future and defining culture. After reviewing hundreds of accomplished and inspiring women, the magazine narrowed the list down to 100. Included in this year’s coveted list alongside Jennifer Lopez, CEO of J. Lo Beautyand Kim Kardashian, CEO of Skims, a next-generation underwear, loungewear and shapewear line and SKKN By Kim and various industry titans from Instagram, Netflix and Roc Nation are:

Sarah Chung, Founder and CEO of Landing International; Shai Eisenman, founder of Bubble; Yarden Horwitz, co-founder of Spate; Nicola Kilner; co-founder and CEO of Deciem; Jenn Harper, Founder and CEO of Cheekbone Beauty; and Carolyn Aronson; founder and CEO of It’s a 10 Haircare.

Sarah Chung, CEO, Landing International

Established in 2016, International landing is a B2B technology platform that helps independent beauty and wellness brands thrive. Last summer, the company’s CEO, Sarah Chung, launched the BeautyFluent mobile app to put influential power back in the hands of beauty advisors, connecting them with buyers and helping them identify and locate the right retail partners. To help bridge the retail training gap among beauty advisors, a number of whom are not onsite when brand representatives visit stores, BeautyFluent helps these advisors send and receive information about products by scanning a barcode. After that, they can get detailed product information and demo tips to experience new products at their convenience.

“I’m truly honored to receive the Entrepreneur‘s 100 Women Influencers,” Chung told Happi. “I’ve been an entrepreneur for over 15 years and receiving this recognition not only supports and encourages me, but also my team and our brands. Landing’s work to advocate for diverse and inclusive beauty brands and beauty professionals on our marketplace platform and mobile training app has resonated with the industry and we look forward to creating more chances for success for brands and beauty professionals.

Yarden Horwitz, co-founder, Spate

New York-based market research company Series is proud to serve as an artificial intelligence solution to find the next big consumer trend.

The company – founded by Yarden Horwitz and Olivier Zimmer who started Google’s Trendspotting division which ran the Google Skin Care Trends report – has harnessed machine learning during the pandemic to analyze more than 20 billion search signals to identify changes in consumer behavior in the beauty and wellness industry. . First to identify the boom in personal care, uncovering trends in turmeric face masks, Spate has expanded into global markets over the past year, including Japan and Korea. Spate has served as a trusted source for L’Oreal, Estée Lauder, Unilever and P&G, to name a few.

“I’m incredibly honored to be on such an influential list of women who are changing their industry,” Horwitz said. “At Spate, our goal has always been to make data more accessible and actionable for brands in the beauty industry. In just four years, we’ve built a platform that more than 150 leading brands rely on. beauty brands and suppliers to meet consumer needs. Excited to bring an intuitive artificial intelligence resource to the table that helps brands of all sizes integrate consumer insights into their portfolios.”

Shai Eisenman, CEO, Bubble

Instead of creating stereotypical skincare products for consumers, Bubble, a Gen Z-focused skincare line, garnered feedback from a community of over 10,000 consumers, including some celebrities, to create a brand that helped build emotional connection among its users. So much so, in fact, that everything from the packaging to the brand name was selected with their input. The products are contained in pump bottles that dispense facial oils, acne treatment, and moisturizer. Just in time for back to school, Bubble products are available at 8,000 Walmart and CVS stores nationwide. Additionally, the brand has partnered with online therapy platform BetterHelp to donate a portion of its profits to help young people struggling with self-image issues seek the help they need. need.

“I’m honored to be one of Entrepreneur’s 100 Women of Influence,” said Eisenman. “Being part of this women’s collective empowers other young female founders to pursue their goals and help change the world of consumerism for the better, especially for Gen Z, one of the most influential generations in the world. By working closely with our Gen Z consumers, we create products they really need – products that work and are accessible – we have a big impact in our community and beyond.

Nicola Kilner, CEO and Co-Founder, Deciem

Deciem, the parent company of skincare brand The Ordinary, brings in around $460 million a year, according to industry estimates. Estée Lauder owns a substantial share (76%) of the company and intends to acquire the remainder within the next three years. Its co-founder, Nicola Kilner, told Entrepreneur that The Ordinary seeks to bring transparency to an industry masked by marketing and so-called miracle claims. While retailers were skeptical that customers would resonate with the brand’s simple product naming, the brand knew that education was also key to making well-informed purchasing decisions.

“You won’t find ‘illuminating serum’ or ‘anti-wrinkle’ type language anywhere in The Ordinary, as all products are named after their key ingredients and the concentration in which they are formulated,” said Kilner told the outlet. “But we persisted with the belief that skincare consumers wanted to be educated about ingredients and were hungry for something more real from the beauty industry.”

Jenn Harper, Founder and CEO, Cheekbone Beauty

Jenn Harper, Founder and CEO of beauty of the cheekbones, is a mission-driven cosmetics company that represents and supports Indigenous youth. Spurred on by her brother’s suicide, Harper aims to foster belief in representation to save lives and empower the next generation. To date, the company has donated more than $200,000 to organizations that support Indigenous youth in addition to running a scholarship fund and supporting environmental causes.

“I like to say the world didn’t need another brand of lipstick, but it needed a brand that truly cares about the planet, and indigenous people protect 80% of the world’s biodiversity. “, Harper told Entrepreneur. “We are the OGs of sustainability.”

Carolyn Aronson, Founder and CEO, It’s a 10 Haircare

It’s a hair care 10, which sells luxury hair products for all types, is among the top Latina-owned beauty businesses at Ulta Beauty and Walgreens. He also advocates for the LGBTQ community with a partnership with The Trevor Project, which offers crisis intervention programs for youth. Aronson told Entrepreneur that she knows the difficulty of starting over and the sacrifices she has to make financially to finally get a return on her investment.

“The best advice I’ve ever received came from my dad, who taught me to live within or below your means so you have the ability to invest in your future,” Aronson told the outlet. “It’s so important to save for bad weather and manage your finances wisely so you can build on a solid foundation.”

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