Some restaurateurs fear take-out liquor orders will increase corporate liability

GREECE, NY (WROC) — Alcohol on the go is here to stay. The popular pandemic shift has allowed people to order and pick up drinks from restaurants. It disappeared but lawmakers brought it back into the state budget. Many restaurants say they survived the pandemic because they were able to sell alcohol to go.

Now they will be able to do it again, but with a twist. They have to sell food with the drink. But one bar owner we spoke to said that even without this takeout alcohol requirement for her.

For bar patrons like Tim Bates, the ability to take another drink home with him after ordering food seems convenient.

“If an individual walks in and gets some takeout food and drink, they might not want to stay here to finish it for 20 to 30 minutes,” Bates said. “Catch him and they’re gone.”

But Robbie Tenant, co-owner of Robbie’s Bar and Grill, opted not to offer any alcoholic beverages to take away. Concerned, it puts too much risk for companies to deal with customers after they leave. Then be slapped with a fine.

“It’s a liability for me because if they don’t put them in the trunk of the car, the liquor board told me it’s on me if they don’t put them in the trunk,” Tenant told us. “And I don’t have the manpower to watch everyone who enters the parking lot. For me, it’s not useful at all. »

This option prohibits the sale of bottled beer at the exit of the restaurant even if you have a take-out order. Instead, bars and restaurants must put drinks in a sealed container. What some owners fear is costing more money than they make.

“Obviously we pay more than a liquor store for our liquor, so they prefer to make them at home,” Tenant explained. “I don’t really see any benefit for us. Unless we sell them in a take-out bottle and again, that really won’t help either. We pay more.

The tenant explained that most of her takeout requests would come once the last call was announced. And worries if customers leave and then drink behind the wheel, her business could be held liable.

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